Sensormatic Hard Tags Can Prevent Purse Pilferage and More

 

                                                                                                                             WC blog 835
Sensormatic Hard Tags – 3
Stop Shoplifting – 3
Sensormatic Hard Tags Can Prevent Purse Pilferage and More
     Shoplifting takes shape in the form of many different people and that can make it difficult to stop shoplifting. From the young child to the kindly grandmother and business owners must be on guard to protect against it.  Is that mother shopping in your store with her children slipping things into her purse while browsing your merchandise? Is that businessman in the suit and tie trustworthy because he appears to be a businessman?  Since there is no way to predict who is going to steal from your store the best decision you can make is to use Sensormatic hard tags to protect your merchandise.  Sesnormatic’s line of tags and labels offer stores the ability to deter theft no matter what the products are that you sell. 
     Thieves can come into your store and you never know who it may be, and sometimes it will surprise you.  A woman entered the store where I worked as a Loss Prevention Associate with her young daughter in tow. They entered the purse and handbag department, a high shortage area. Since it was a high theft department I began closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance. The mother began removing the paper that filled the purse and tugged off the price tags.  I expected the woman to put the purse on her shoulder and walk out of the store. I was shocked as the mother put the handbag on her daughter’s shoulder and started to exit. I stopped the mother and young girl and told the woman she had to return with me and when she asked why I told her because of what she had done with the merchandise. The mother chastised her daughter for trying to steal the purse! I did stop shoplifting of the merchandise but I could not help but feel for the daughter. I couldn’t stop the life she was probably going to grow up with if her mother didn’t change. The point of the story is you don’t know who is going to shoplift. It could be the mother and her child or it may be a drug addict or both. Looks can be deceiving. The second point is that had the purse been protected with a Sensormatic hard tag the theft attempt probably would not have happened in the first place.
     The versatility of Sensormatic devices allows retailers of any size to protect product lines.  Do you sell clothing, sporting goods or purses? There is a Sensormatic hard tag for you that can be used on multiple items. The Sensormatic AM Alarming 3-Tone Supertag would be a great solution. It can be pinned through any of these items and provide a triple layer of protection. The first is an alarm if the tag is tampered with. The next layer is that the tag will set off Sensormatic pedestals if tagged merchandise is carried into the detection field. Finally these devices have an internal alarm that will sound if the tag is carried past the towers and outside the store. You may be asking if it makes a difference if the tag alarm sounds if it is carried out of the store. I will tell you it does because it tells everyone outside the store that the suspect stole merchandise and crooks don’t want to be identified.
     If the 3-Tone Sensormatic hard tag had been used on our purses I am reasonably certain the suspect would not have bothered trying to walk out with the merchandise and would have saved her daughter from the experience. By removing the manufacturer’s label she showed she was trying to make the handbag look like it was a personal item. A Sensormatic tag would have been obvious to any observer it was not her (or her daughter’s) purse. That is the value of anti-theft products, to deter potential thieves from stealing.
     Sensormatic tags themselves won’t stop shoplifting but they are certain to make criminals think twice before committing a crime. Having a good customer service culture combined with anti-theft products will significantly reduce shoplifting and increase profits for your store and that is what you should be striving for. 
For more information about Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 
      
     

Shoplifting takes shape in the form of many different people and that can make it difficult to stop shoplifting. From the young child to the kindly grandmother and business owners must be on guard to protect against it.  Is that mother shopping in your store with her children slipping things into her purse while browsing your merchandise? Is that businessman in the suit and tie trustworthy because he appears to be a businessman?  Since there is no way to predict who is going to steal from your store the best decision you can make is to use Sensormatic hard tags to protect your merchandise.  Sesnormatic’s line of tags and labels offer stores the ability to deter theft no matter what the products are that you sell. 

Thieves can come into your store and you never know who it may be, and sometimes it will surprise you.  A woman entered the store where I worked as a Loss Prevention Associate with her young daughter in tow. They entered the purse and handbag department, a high shortage area. Since it was a high theft department I began closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance. The mother began removing the paper that filled the purse and tugged off the price tags.  I expected the woman to put the purse on her shoulder and walk out of the store. I was shocked as the mother put the handbag on her daughter’s shoulder and started to exit. I stopped the mother and young girl and told the woman she had to return with me and when she asked why I told her because of what she had done with the merchandise. The mother chastised her daughter for trying to steal the purse! I did stop shoplifting of the merchandise but I could not help but feel for the daughter. I couldn’t stop the life she was probably going to grow up with if her mother didn’t change. The point of the story is you don’t know who is going to shoplift. It could be the mother and her child or it may be a drug addict or both. Looks can be deceiving. The second point is that had the purse been protected with a Sensormatic hard tag the theft attempt probably would not have happened in the first place.

The versatility of Sensormatic devices allows retailers of any size to protect product lines.  Do you sell clothing, sporting goods or purses? There is a Sensormatic hard tag for you that can be used on multiple items. The Sensormatic AM Alarming 3-Tone Supertag would be a great solution. It can be pinned through any of these items and provide a triple layer of protection. The first is an alarm if the tag is tampered with. The next layer is that the tag will set off Sensormatic pedestals if tagged merchandise is carried into the detection field. Finally these devices have an internal alarm that will sound if the tag is carried past the towers and outside the store. You may be asking if it makes a difference if the tag alarm sounds if it is carried out of the store. I will tell you it does because it tells everyone outside the store that the suspect stole merchandise and crooks don’t want to be identified.

If the 3-Tone Sensormatic hard tag had been used on our purses I am reasonably certain the suspect would not have bothered trying to walk out with the merchandise and would have saved her daughter from the experience. By removing the manufacturer’s label she showed she was trying to make the handbag look like it was a personal item. A Sensormatic tag would have been obvious to any observer it was not her (or her daughter’s) purse. That is the value of anti-theft products, to deter potential thieves from stealing.

Sensormatic tags themselves won’t stop shoplifting but they are certain to make criminals think twice before committing a crime. Having a good customer service culture combined with anti-theft products will significantly reduce shoplifting and increase profits for your store and that is what you should be striving for. 

 

For more information about Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

 

Be A Good Neighbor Secure Sensormatic Security System Detachment Devices.

 

Anti-shoplifting – 3                                                                                                                    WC Blog 836
Sensormatic security system-3
Be A Good Neighbor Secure Sensormatic Security System Detachment Devices.
        
     I work as a Sales Specialist and on more than one occasion I have come across anti-shoplifting devices that have been removed from merchandise.  I have located wraps that were unlocked and hidden behind other merchandise. I have found security boxes that were unlocked and the merchandise was missing.  In one particular incident a very expensive set of printer cartridges had been taken and a check of inventory counts verified this. Since I have an extensive Loss Prevention background I was certain one of two things took place. A shoplifter had access to a security detachment key or an employee had stolen the goods because they would have access to the keys. It is a sad fact that many stores do not properly secure Sensormatic security system keys or detachment tools. They are often left in an easy to access location next to a cash register or portable keys are left lying on counter tops by careless employees.
       It would be easy to say the ink cartridge theft was just an inside job or the work of a dishonest employee but I know of other stores that have had similar problems. My daughter works for a clothing retailer that uses Sensormatic security system products and she has found multiple wraps and tags that have been removed from merchandise. She is meticulous in keeping her departments straight and one evening she had straightened an area and returned an hour or so later and found a duffle bag that had a lot of tags in it. Each one had been opened or unlocked not forcibly removed from products. Based on how busy she said her store was that night there would not have been sufficient time for an employee to steal that much merchandise, it had to be a shoplifter.
     
     Retail anti-shoplifting devices do provide protection from shoplifting and even employee theft.  I have used these security products myself to minimize the possibility of thieves pilfering our merchandise.  I can say from my many years of Loss Prevention experience that stores that properly use merchandise protection devices see a significant reduction in merchandise shrinkage. By proper use I mean attaching devices the right way and securing the detachment tools/keys properly. One example I can think of is the Sensormatic security systems Ultra-Gator Manual Handheld Detacher. The detacher itself is portable if need be and can be used by an employee on the salesfloor while stocking apparel and they put a tag on incorrectly. It saves time over going to the register or point of sale to detach a tag. The problem is some employees get careless and leave the detachers lying around. They may place it on their work cart and leave it unattended as they go on a break. That leaves the detacher vulnerable to a crook who then picks it up and uses it in any store that uses Sensormatic tags.
     For a merchandise protection program to be truly effective not only must the merchandise in a store be properly tagged to secure them but the removal devices themselves must be secured. At the point of sale these units can usually be screwed to the counter to prevent someone from picking them up and walking off with them. Several of the Sensormatic devices have a lock to prevent unauthorized use when a register is unattended. In the case of handheld devices there are a couple of ideas I have. If employees have a work cart as a mobile workstation, attach a lock box where devices can be stored while the employee goes on a break. The alternative is to require devices to be checked in and out at a central location every time the detacher is needed. If there is no electronic article surveillance protection on the detachment tool, attach lanyard and a Sensormatic hard tag to the unit.
     Anti-shoplifting programs that incorporate Sensormatic products are a sure way to improve profits through reduced theft. It is important that proper tagging procedures and methods are in place. It is just as important that a store is protecting the devices that make the system so effective. Protect your detachment tools to help yourself and other stores that use Sensormatic products as well. 
Anti-shoplifting is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

I work as a Sales Specialist and on more than one occasion I have come across anti-shoplifting devices that have been removed from merchandise.  I have located wraps that were unlocked and hidden behind other merchandise. I have found security boxes that were unlocked and the merchandise was missing.  In one particular incident a very expensive set of printer cartridges had been taken and a check of inventory counts verified this. Since I have an extensive Loss Prevention background I was certain one of two things took place. A shoplifter had access to a security detachment key or an employee had stolen the goods because they would have access to the keys. It is a sad fact that many stores do not properly secure Sensormatic security system keys or detachment tools. They are often left in an easy to access location next to a cash register or portable keys are left lying on counter tops by careless employees.

It would be easy to say the ink cartridge theft was just an inside job or the work of a dishonest employee but I know of other stores that have had similar problems. My daughter works for a clothing retailer that uses Sensormatic security system products and she has found multiple wraps and tags that have been removed from merchandise. She is meticulous in keeping her departments straight and one evening she had straightened an area and returned an hour or so later and found a duffle bag that had a lot of tags in it. Each one had been opened or unlocked not forcibly removed from products. Based on how busy she said her store was that night there would not have been sufficient time for an employee to steal that much merchandise, it had to be a shoplifter.

 

Retail anti-shoplifting devices do provide protection from shoplifting and even employee theft.  I have used these security products myself to minimize the possibility of thieves pilfering our merchandise.  I can say from my many years of Loss Prevention experience that stores that properly use merchandise protection devices see a significant reduction in merchandise shrinkage. By proper use I mean attaching devices the right way and securing the detachment tools/keys properly. One example I can think of is the Sensormatic security systems Ultra-Gator Manual Handheld Detacher. The detacher itself is portable if need be and can be used by an employee on the salesfloor while stocking apparel and they put a tag on incorrectly. It saves time over going to the register or point of sale to detach a tag. The problem is some employees get careless and leave the detachers lying around. They may place it on their work cart and leave it unattended as they go on a break. That leaves the detacher vulnerable to a crook who then picks it up and uses it in any store that uses Sensormatic tags.

For a merchandise protection program to be truly effective not only must the merchandise in a store be properly tagged to secure them but the removal devices themselves must be secured. At the point of sale these units can usually be screwed to the counter to prevent someone from picking them up and walking off with them. Several of the Sensormatic devices have a lock to prevent unauthorized use when a register is unattended. In the case of handheld devices there are a couple of ideas I have. If employees have a work cart as a mobile workstation, attach a lock box where devices can be stored while the employee goes on a break. The alternative is to require devices to be checked in and out at a central location every time the detacher is needed. If there is no electronic article surveillance protection on the detachment tool, attach lanyard and a Sensormatic hard tag to the unit.

Anti-shoplifting programs that incorporate Sensormatic products are a sure way to improve profits through reduced theft. It is important that proper tagging procedures and methods are in place. It is just as important that a store is protecting the devices that make the system so effective. Protect your detachment tools to help yourself and other stores that use Sensormatic products as well. 

 

Anti-shoplifting is important and we can help you with it. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

 

Overcoming Language Barriers In Retail From Customer Service To Sensormatic Labels

 

Sensormatic Labels – 3                                                                                                          WC Blog 822
Stop Shoplifting – 3
Overcoming Language Barriers In Retail From Customer Service To Sensormatic Labels
     When I write articles about Sensormatic labels or theft prevention I sometimes have to catch myself not using Loss Prevention terminology. The same can be true when I am asked to train a new employee. I will sometimes ask that person if they have retail experience so I have an idea how simplistic I have to be when instructing the employee. Language can be a barrier in many things even when we speak the same language. There are times in retail when we have to be able to interpret what a customer is saying to us. I have had someone looking around our store and seemed to be looking for something specific. I ask if I can assist and they say I don’t know what it’s called but I need such and such and they begin to try to describe it. The other day a customer tried to describe to me an attachment he wanted for his computer to hook it up to his router. It required me to really have to decipher what he was trying to tell me he wanted. Eventually I figured out he wanted a wireless adapter for his computer. It was a task but it was worth the time I spent because he did make the purchase. Had I not spent the time the patron would have left without making a purchase and the store would have lost the sale. Using terminology appropriate to an audience is an important aspect of retail and I would include Loss Prevention in that when discussing how to stop shoplifting.
     Think of some jargon you use when training a new employee in a store. Do you revert to acronyms and talk about a POS (point of sale) or do you talk about a UPC (universal price code)? Maybe you jump into training and talk about endcaps, wings, gondolas or zoning and forget to define what these are. Your new employee gives you that glazed look but you don’t pick up the unspoken signals they are giving that should tell you they are lost. Yes, even unspoken signals are a type of language all their own. Right or wrong you are expected to pick up on them. When I would speak to a new Loss Prevention Associate I had to explain the difference between anti-theft devices. Sensormatic labels are much different than Sensormatic hard tags. They provide different levels of security while both operate on an electronic article surveillance system. Which brings me to Loss Prevention acronyms. We use PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom cameras), perp (perpetrator), and some may use NPI (non-productive incident) for a bad stop. We sometimes forget that new people don’t know what we take for granted. We assume what they don’t know they will pick up on in due time. Shame on us. As managers and trainers we owe it to our new employees to speak in language they understand. If I expect to train managers in stores with no Loss Prevention department about how to stop shoplifting I have to clarify terms familiar to me. BOB (Bottom of Basket), LISA (Look InSide Always), PETER (Pass Everything Through Every Time) are acronyms I and many in big box retail know. But not every manager is going to know what they mean and they will start looking around for these people. If we are going to train new employees using acronyms or jargon, we have to define the meaning of the words so our employees/managers will be successful.
      If I want to train your managers on protecting merchandise against theft using electronic article surveillance I need to talk about how Sensormatic labels are applied to merchandise. I don’t want it slapped on to goods. I want branding to be right and I don’t want to cover warning labels or manufacturer labels if possible. I am going to demonstrate how to put a Sensormatic hard tag on and why it needs to be placed consistently. Put a clothing tag wherever you feel like placing one and cashiers are going to take longer to remove tags or a large number of false alarms are going to occur. I will demonstrate how to test a Sensormatic system, troubleshoot minor problems and how remote monitoring can often prevent the need for service calls. Finally, if I am training your managers I am going to teach them how a proper response to a Sensormatic alarm can improve the chance of recovering unpaid merchandise and stop shoplifting. 
     Knowing how to speak the language of an audience can be helpful in much of what we do in retail. From customer service to training to loss prevention the right words and ability to read body language can influence how well the store performs. Build stronger teams and client relations through better communication.
 Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

When I write articles about Sensormatic labels or theft prevention I sometimes have to catch myself not using Loss Prevention terminology. The same can be true when I am asked to train a new employee. I will sometimes ask that person if they have retail experience so I have an idea how simplistic I have to be when instructing the employee. Language can be a barrier in many things even when we speak the same language. There are times in retail when we have to be able to interpret what a customer is saying to us. I have had someone looking around our store and seemed to be looking for something specific. I ask if I can assist and they say I don’t know what it’s called but I need such and such and they begin to try to describe it. The other day a customer tried to describe to me an attachment he wanted for his computer to hook it up to his router. It required me to really have to decipher what he was trying to tell me he wanted. Eventually I figured out he wanted a wireless adapter for his computer. It was a task but it was worth the time I spent because he did make the purchase. Had I not spent the time the patron would have left without making a purchase and the store would have lost the sale. Using terminology appropriate to an audience is an important aspect of retail and I would include Loss Prevention in that when discussing how to stop shoplifting.

Think of some jargon you use when training a new employee in a store. Do you revert to acronyms and talk about a POS (point of sale) or do you talk about a UPC (universal price code)? Maybe you jump into training and talk about endcaps, wings, gondolas or zoning and forget to define what these are. Your new employee gives you that glazed look but you don’t pick up the unspoken signals they are giving that should tell you they are lost. Yes, even unspoken signals are a type of language all their own. Right or wrong you are expected to pick up on them. When I would speak to a new Loss Prevention Associate I had to explain the difference between anti-theft devices. Sensormatic labels are much different than Sensormatic hard tags. They provide different levels of security while both operate on an electronic article surveillance system. Which brings me to Loss Prevention acronyms. We use PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom cameras), perp (perpetrator), and some may use NPI (non-productive incident) for a bad stop. We sometimes forget that new people don’t know what we take for granted. We assume what they don’t know they will pick up on in due time. Shame on us. As managers and trainers we owe it to our new employees to speak in language they understand. If I expect to train managers in stores with no Loss Prevention department about how to stop shoplifting I have to clarify terms familiar to me. BOB (Bottom of Basket), LISA (Look InSide Always), PETER (Pass Everything Through Every Time) are acronyms I and many in big box retail know. But not every manager is going to know what they mean and they will start looking around for these people. If we are going to train new employees using acronyms or jargon, we have to define the meaning of the words so our employees/managers will be successful.

If I want to train your managers on protecting merchandise against theft using electronic article surveillance I need to talk about how Sensormatic labels are applied to merchandise. I don’t want it slapped on to goods. I want branding to be right and I don’t want to cover warning labels or manufacturer labels if possible. I am going to demonstrate how to put a Sensormatic hard tag on and why it needs to be placed consistently. Put a clothing tag wherever you feel like placing one and cashiers are going to take longer to remove tags or a large number of false alarms are going to occur. I will demonstrate how to test a Sensormatic system, troubleshoot minor problems and how remote monitoring can often prevent the need for service calls. Finally, if I am training your managers I am going to teach them how a proper response to a Sensormatic alarm can improve the chance of recovering unpaid merchandise and stop shoplifting. 

Knowing how to speak the language of an audience can be helpful in much of what we do in retail. From customer service to training to loss prevention the right words and ability to read body language can influence how well the store performs. Build stronger teams and client relations through better communication. 

 

Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

From Clothing Security To Human Resources Consistency Is Important

 

Sensormatic Tags –3                                                                                                           WC Blog 832
Clothing security -3
From Clothing Security To Human Resources Consistency Is Important
     From the use of Sensormatic tags to prevent theft to how you enforce policies in your store, consistency is an important factor in how successful or unsuccessful your business will be. I thought about consistency as I attended a college baseball game not long ago. The team had started off the season strong and was ranked as high as 11 in one of the NCAA baseball polls early on. Then for some unexplained reason the team just fell into a slump. Pitching became inconsistent, batting was hit or miss (pun intended) and watching the team in their dugout the energy was gone. The night before I attended my game our team had run roughshod over their opponent. The night I attended the tables turned 180 degrees and we got our clock cleaned. You can’t have this kind of on again – off again performance and expect to make a run for the National Baseball Championship. In retail consistency also matters and that can be in how you manage clothing security and tag clothing or how you handle attendance issues with your team members.
     On more than one occasion I have been shopping in a retail store and I have looked at the way merchandise is protected. I may see one television with a wrap on it and another that is left with no anti-theft device right next to it. I have observed purses with different styles of security devices placed in different locations. For the cashiers this is a terrible way to tag products. They spend time trying to search and ensure there are no tags “hidden” somewhere that might set off the alarm and embarrass the customer. It can lead to a waste of productivity at the checkout counter. On the other hand I have shopped in the clothing store where my daughter works and I have been very impressed with the consistency of how they employ Sensormatic tags. All of the dresses were tagged at the collar and ALL of the shoes were tagged the same way based on the style of the shoe. The only thing I did not care for was the use of different brands of tags. I would have preferred to see a consistent use of only Sensormatic products. I know how effective they are in clothing security and theft prevention all around because I have used them in my Loss Prevention career.
         Consistency is also important when it comes to personnel matters. Let’s say you have an employee who is a great worker but they consistently show up late to work sometimes it is only 5 minutes and other times it may be 15 or 20 minutes. Because they are a good worker you may verbally remind them they have to be to work on time but you don’t want to lose them so you give them some leeway. Then you have other employees who you do enforce a tardiness policy on. Those people get a verbal warning, a written warning and then a final warning. If you are enforcing the policy on them but not on your superstar you are creating an unfair workplace and you are fostering resentment within your team. Consistent application of policies is just as critical to a productive workplace as the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing. Stores invest a lot of time protecting merchandise that same level of energy or more should be placed on team development and morale.
     Consistency in following a return policy is another operational issue that can be disruptive and hurt a store. I understand that managers will from time to time have to use sound judgement and make exceptions in the arena of customer service. However exceptions should be that exceptions and not the rule. If your employees feel that they have followed store procedures and a manager is called to address a customer complaint about a return policy. The first thing that manager must do is listen to the associate then the customer and make it clear that the employee was following proper procedure. If the manager chooses to make an exception he/she must say that this is an exception and will not be done again. It builds the credibility of the employee and shows that management supports them. If a manager is regularly making exceptions to policies that is another problem and the store manager should be addressing that issue. 
     From clothing security to personnel matters consistency in how tasks are accomplished and people are treated absolutely make an impact in how successful a store will be. Just like a baseball team there will be losses from time to time but the best teams perform consistently day after day. Make daily routines and consistent expectations a part of your business and see your business grow.
Sensormatic tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

From the use of Sensormatic tags to prevent theft to how you enforce policies in your store, consistency is an important factor in how successful or unsuccessful your business will be. I thought about consistency as I attended a college baseball game not long ago. The team had started off the season strong and was ranked as high as 11 in one of the NCAA baseball polls early on. Then for some unexplained reason the team just fell into a slump. Pitching became inconsistent, batting was hit or miss (pun intended) and watching the team in their dugout the energy was gone. The night before I attended my game our team had run roughshod over their opponent. The night I attended the tables turned 180 degrees and we got our clock cleaned. You can’t have this kind of on again – off again performance and expect to make a run for the National Baseball Championship. In retail consistency also matters and that can be in how you manage clothing security and tag clothing or how you handle attendance issues with your team members.

On more than one occasion I have been shopping in a retail store and I have looked at the way merchandise is protected. I may see one television with a wrap on it and another that is left with no anti-theft device right next to it. I have observed purses with different styles of security devices placed in different locations. For the cashiers this is a terrible way to tag products. They spend time trying to search and ensure there are no tags “hidden” somewhere that might set off the alarm and embarrass the customer. It can lead to a waste of productivity at the checkout counter. On the other hand I have shopped in the clothing store where my daughter works and I have been very impressed with the consistency of how they employ Sensormatic tags. All of the dresses were tagged at the collar and ALL of the shoes were tagged the same way based on the style of the shoe. The only thing I did not care for was the use of different brands of tags. I would have preferred to see a consistent use of only Sensormatic products. I know how effective they are in clothing security and theft prevention all around because I have used them in my Loss Prevention career.

Consistency is also important when it comes to personnel matters. Let’s say you have an employee who is a great worker but they consistently show up late to work sometimes it is only 5 minutes and other times it may be 15 or 20 minutes. Because they are a good worker you may verbally remind them they have to be to work on time but you don’t want to lose them so you give them some leeway. Then you have other employees who you do enforce a tardiness policy on. Those people get a verbal warning, a written warning and then a final warning. If you are enforcing the policy on them but not on your superstar you are creating an unfair workplace and you are fostering resentment within your team. Consistent application of policies is just as critical to a productive workplace as the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing. Stores invest a lot of time protecting merchandise that same level of energy or more should be placed on team development and morale.

Consistency in following a return policy is another operational issue that can be disruptive and hurt a store. I understand that managers will from time to time have to use sound judgement and make exceptions in the arena of customer service. However exceptions should be that exceptions and not the rule. If your employees feel that they have followed store procedures and a manager is called to address a customer complaint about a return policy. The first thing that manager must do is listen to the associate then the customer and make it clear that the employee was following proper procedure. If the manager chooses to make an exception he/she must say that this is an exception and will not be done again. It builds the credibility of the employee and shows that management supports them. If a manager is regularly making exceptions to policies that is another problem and the store manager should be addressing that issue. 

From clothing security to personnel matters consistency in how tasks are accomplished and people are treated absolutely make an impact in how successful a store will be. Just like a baseball team there will be losses from time to time but the best teams perform consistently day after day. Make daily routines and consistent expectations a part of your business and see your business grow.

 

Sensormatic tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

 

Your Way Overdue If You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags To Protect Baby Clothes






Clothing Security Tags – 4                                                                                                           WC Blog 823
Sensormatic Tags – 3

Your Way Overdue If You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags To Protect Baby Clothes 

     When discussing the use of clothing security tags to stop theft what comes to mind first, swim suits, dresses, slacks or dress shirts? Maybe you would say baseball hats, ties and maybe even accessories including purses and wallets. You wouldn’t be wrong but I would like to suggest that you could be missing out on an entire line of products that can be expensive in their own right. Infant clothes can be just as vulnerable to theft as grown-up attire and in some instances they can be an easier target for those looking for the five-finger discount. I have had mothers I caught loading up infant diaper bags while shopping with their toddlers. I once had an entire family pushing a baby stroller and a couple of the group would conceal merchandise under the blankets inside the stroller. Oh don’t worry the baby was fine, the dad was carrying the infant so she wouldn’t be disturbed. One thing I learned over the seventeen or so years I spent in Loss Prevention was that if it isn’t tied down or protected with Sensormatic tags someone will probably try to steal it.

     The theft of baby and toddler clothing can happen more often than you might think and it can cost retailers a lot of money. For example, according to live5news.com, April 26, 2019, in a story, “Cops: Wanted couple had toddler with them during shoplifting at baby clothing shop”, a couple shoplifted “approximately $132.97” in merchandise. Items believed stolen included “…boy’s pajamas and boys swim trunks”. Now that may not sound like a huge haul but for a small boutique that can have quite an impact. Were clothing security tags in use? I cannot say for certain. After a bit of searching on the internet and I believe I found the store’s website and pictures and I did not see any evidence. There were no visible Sensormatic towers at the doors and I did not see any Sensormatic tags hanging from the clothing.
     Do you need more evidence that baby apparel and care products are a hot commodity? The Napa Valley Register report on November 16, 2018 displayed the headline, “Woman arrested for stealing more than $1,200 of baby items and other merchandise, police say”. The report said that, “A woman was arrested for stealing diapers, baby blankets, baby clothes (emphasis mine), Pediasure, orange juice, batteries and more in American Canyon…” Again, we have another instance where infant clothes were stolen and the store the suspect was stealing from does not use clothing security tags on any of the clothing merchandise they carry. The business where the theft took place is a huge entity and I dare say can afford the losses that take place in their locations. However, should these thefts take place in the small retail establishment such hits are not sustainable. 

     The solution is simple to prevent such losses but there are retailers who decide not to take the steps that would solve the issue. Installing a Sensormatic security system is the first recommendation I give to businesses. No, don’t go trying to buy a used system or a second-rate electronic article surveillance brand. Purchase a new Sensormatic system and you know you are getting a quality product. Better yet, purchase that system from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and you will also receive free training on how to stop shoplifting from people who worked in Retail Loss Prevention. You won’t get that offer from another company. After installing the security system you will want to protect merchandise with Sensormatic tags. Again, if you purchase your system through Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. they can provide you with best practices for tagging and make suggestions on what you should be tagging in your store.

     Shoplifting is a problem and it affects all clothing retail stores from fine apparel to infant clothes. Criminals are only concerned with how much they can steal without being caught and how much they can get for the merchandise. Don’t be a childish and throw a tantrum when they steal from you. Be proactive and get clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system now.
Need information on clothing security tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.      

When discussing the use of clothing security tags to stop theft what comes to mind first, swim suits, dresses, slacks or dress shirts? Maybe you would say baseball hats, ties and maybe even accessories including purses and wallets. You wouldn’t be wrong but I would like to suggest that you could be missing out on an entire line of products that can be expensive in their own right. Infant clothes can be just as vulnerable to theft as grown-up attire and in some instances they can be an easier target for those looking for the five-finger discount. I have had mothers I caught loading up infant diaper bags while shopping with their toddlers. I once had an entire family pushing a baby stroller and a couple of the group would conceal merchandise under the blankets inside the stroller. Oh don’t worry the baby was fine, the dad was carrying the infant so she wouldn’t be disturbed. One thing I learned over the seventeen or so years I spent in Loss Prevention was that if it isn’t tied down or protected with Sensormatic tags someone will probably try to steal it.
     

The theft of baby and toddler clothing can happen more often than you might think and it can cost retailers a lot of money. For example, according to live5news.com, April 26, 2019, in a story, “Cops: Wanted couple had toddler with them during shoplifting at baby clothing shop”, a couple shoplifted “approximately $132.97” in merchandise. Items believed stolen included “…boy’s pajamas and boys swim trunks”. Now that may not sound like a huge haul but for a small boutique that can have quite an impact. Were clothing security tags in use? I cannot say for certain. After a bit of searching on the internet and I believe I found the store’s website and pictures and I did not see any evidence. There were no visible Sensormatic towers at the doors and I did not see any Sensormatic tags hanging from the clothing.     

 

 Do you need more evidence that baby apparel and care products are a hot commodity? The Napa Valley Register report on November 16, 2018 displayed the headline, “Woman arrested for stealing more than $1,200 of baby items and other merchandise, police say”. The report said that, “A woman was arrested for stealing diapers, baby blankets, baby clothes (emphasis mine), Pediasure, orange juice, batteries and more in American Canyon…” Again, we have another instance where infant clothes were stolen and the store the suspect was stealing from does not use clothing security tags on any of the clothing merchandise they carry. The business where the theft took place is a huge entity and I dare say can afford the losses that take place in their locations. However, should these thefts take place in the small retail establishment such hits are not sustainable. 

     

The solution is simple to prevent such losses but there are retailers who decide not to take the steps that would solve the issue. Installing a Sensormatic security system is the first recommendation I give to businesses. No, don’t go trying to buy a used system or a second-rate electronic article surveillance brand. Purchase a new Sensormatic system and you know you are getting a quality product. Better yet, purchase that system from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and you will also receive free training on how to stop shoplifting from people who worked in Retail Loss Prevention. You won’t get that offer from another company. After installing the security system you will want to protect merchandise with Sensormatic tags. Again, if you purchase your system through Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. they can provide you with best practices for tagging and make suggestions on what you should be tagging in your store.
     

Shoplifting is a problem and it affects all clothing retail stores from fine apparel to infant clothes. Criminals are only concerned with how much they can steal without being caught and how much they can get for the merchandise. Don’t be a childish and throw a tantrum when they steal from you. Be proactive and get clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system now.

 

Need information on clothing security tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.      

 

A Conversation About Clothing Security

 

Clothing Security –3                                                                                                                     WC Blog 818
Sensormatic tags -3
A Conversation About Clothing Security
     I am sitting here in the college library where I work and I am hearing a conversation behind me about clothing security. The speaker is loud and I cannot help but overhear the discussion, though trust me I would rather not hear most of it. I did hear him talk about working in a fitting room at the store where he is employed and finding that someone had stolen merchandise. I could not catch all of what he was saying but somehow he or the people in the store knew that the same person had been in the store twice stealing. That got me to thinking, how did you know that the same person was in the store twice in one day stealing? Did someone review video and see this? I also want to know how someone was able to steal if the fitting is attended by an associate? I could not hear particulars and just as quickly as it started the conversation switched to another topic and was just as annoying but now I was on to writing my article. This conversation provided the perfect lead in. Just how do you prevent clothing theft and should you be concerned with everything or just certain items?
     Since the yappy student behind me started the whole thing let’s begin with the way to prevent shoplifting. Your first instinct may be to say that using Sensormatic tags and security system is going to be my first recommendation. Your first instinct is going to be wrong. What I am going to tell you is that the first thing you need to do to reduce clothing theft is to get Manager training on how to stop shoplifting and also employee theft. That’s right, shoplifters aren’t the only people carting off clothing. Merchandise theft is an internal problem as much as an external one and in some cases it involves both. Owners and store managers have to know how to identify the signals and indicators that gives thieves away. That can only be possible when someone has undergone proper training. Once that is done you can begin training employees on how to help stop the shortage too. 
     Now you just know that the next step is going to involve placing Sensormatic tags and installing a security system. Again, you are wrong. You want to reduce theft? Start using pre-employment background screening and drug testing. No, you aren’t testing your customers. You test the people you are thinking about hiring. You eliminate the riff-raff and improve the chances that your staff is filled with honest personnel who do not pose security concerns for your business.
     You know what’s coming now don’t you, yup now is when you install that Sensormatic system and begin using clothing security tags on merchandise. You don’t necessarily have to tag everything to begin seeing results. Tag merchandise your inventory results point to as high theft departments and begin to prevent shoplifting there. If your store sells shoes place tags on the most popular brands. I would not encourage you to tag flip flops or low-end designs. Tag what shoplifters are stealing. Fashion accessories such as purses, wallets, scarves and neckties can also be high theft items in the clothing world. Purses are highly vulnerable since they can be tossed over a shoulder and look like it belongs to the carrier. The same holds true for hats, you put it on your head and walk out of the store. Unless employees are paying attention hats are easy to steal. 
     This brings us full circle to where that annoying conversation comes in to play. Attention is a requirement for employees to help prevent shoplifting. If they are not paying attention to what is taking place around them the shoplifters are going to go unnoticed and commit their crimes. You can use clothing security tags on merchandise but if your workers are inattentive or apathetic they are not going to be effective in responding to electronic article surveillance alarms at the doors. They will also be careless in inspecting what people are taking in and out of the fitting rooms.  The same thief will be able to enter the store numerous times during a day and no one will notice. 
     Install a Sensormatic system and use Sensormatic tags on the clothes that are being stolen. Train your managers on how to stop theft. Use pre-employment screening to reduce the chance for theft in your store and finally make sure employees are actively engaging customers. You do this and the conversation I heard in the library will be a non-issue for you. 
For more information on about clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 

I am sitting here in the college library where I work and I am hearing a conversation behind me about clothing security. The speaker is loud and I cannot help but overhear the discussion, though trust me I would rather not hear most of it. I did hear him talk about working in a fitting room at the store where he is employed and finding that someone had stolen merchandise. I could not catch all of what he was saying but somehow he or the people in the store knew that the same person had been in the store twice stealing. That got me to thinking, how did you know that the same person was in the store twice in one day stealing? Did someone review video and see this? I also want to know how someone was able to steal if the fitting is attended by an associate? I could not hear particulars and just as quickly as it started the conversation switched to another topic and was just as annoying but now I was on to writing my article. This conversation provided the perfect lead in. Just how do you prevent clothing theft and should you be concerned with everything or just certain items?

Since the yappy student behind me started the whole thing let’s begin with the way to prevent shoplifting. Your first instinct may be to say that using Sensormatic tags and security system is going to be my first recommendation. Your first instinct is going to be wrong. What I am going to tell you is that the first thing you need to do to reduce clothing theft is to get Manager training on how to stop shoplifting and also employee theft. That’s right, shoplifters aren’t the only people carting off clothing. Merchandise theft is an internal problem as much as an external one and in some cases it involves both. Owners and store managers have to know how to identify the signals and indicators that gives thieves away. That can only be possible when someone has undergone proper training. Once that is done you can begin training employees on how to help stop the shortage too. 

Now you just know that the next step is going to involve placing Sensormatic tags and installing a security system. Again, you are wrong. You want to reduce theft? Start using pre-employment background screening and drug testing. No, you aren’t testing your customers. You test the people you are thinking about hiring. You eliminate the riff-raff and improve the chances that your staff is filled with honest personnel who do not pose security concerns for your business.

You know what’s coming now don’t you, yup now is when you install that Sensormatic system and begin using clothing security tags on merchandise. You don’t necessarily have to tag everything to begin seeing results. Tag merchandise your inventory results point to as high theft departments and begin to prevent shoplifting there. If your store sells shoes place tags on the most popular brands. I would not encourage you to tag flip flops or low-end designs. Tag what shoplifters are stealing. Fashion accessories such as purses, wallets, scarves and neckties can also be high theft items in the clothing world. Purses are highly vulnerable since they can be tossed over a shoulder and look like it belongs to the carrier. The same holds true for hats, you put it on your head and walk out of the store. Unless employees are paying attention hats are easy to steal. 

This brings us full circle to where that annoying conversation comes in to play. Attention is a requirement for employees to help prevent shoplifting. If they are not paying attention to what is taking place around them the shoplifters are going to go unnoticed and commit their crimes. You can use clothing security tags on merchandise but if your workers are inattentive or apathetic they are not going to be effective in responding to electronic article surveillance alarms at the doors. They will also be careless in inspecting what people are taking in and out of the fitting rooms.  The same thief will be able to enter the store numerous times during a day and no one will notice. 

Install a Sensormatic system and use Sensormatic tags on the clothes that are being stolen. Train your managers on how to stop theft. Use pre-employment screening to reduce the chance for theft in your store and finally make sure employees are actively engaging customers. You do this and the conversation I heard in the library will be a non-issue for you. 

 

For more information on about clothing security, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 

 

 

Are Your Anti-Shoplifting Efforts Impacted By New Processes?

 

Anti-Shoplifting – 4                                                                                                          WC Blog 820
Sensormatic Security System -3
Are Your Anti-Shoplifting Efforts Impacted By New Processes?
     I was in line at a big box retail store and was struck by several things that left me pondering their front end operation strategy and the anti-shoplifting program. This store has undergone a remodel of the front end replacing some of the cash registers with additional self-checkout counters. As my wife and I stood in line waiting to go through the self-checkout lanes I could not help but to be amused that I was standing in line in a system that was supposed to speed up the checkout process. Now, I get amused (and annoyed) relatively easily especially when I see how dumb something is. So I note while standing in this line that a lane becomes open. The cashier(s) who are supposed to be directing traffic are having a conversation. Please note that I said cashiers in the plural.  That’s right, this model of efficiency, had TWO cashiers working in the self-checkout line. These two were not paying attention to the customers, what they were doing or when they were finishing their transactions. What should have been a faster process was painfully slow. I turned to my wife and suggested how much faster it could have been had the second cashier been on a register checking out patrons rather than wagging the tongue. I think she shushed me at this point as my voice tends to carry especially when it is speaking sarcasms. I also saw some things that made me wonder about how the store’s merchandise protection.
     I will tell you that I know this store has electronic article surveillance in use but I do not know if it is a Sensormatic security system or a competitor brand. Regardless I saw a lot of merchandise going through the self-check lanes and I was not seeing any security tags. Now I will acknowledge that this company is one that does use vendor source tagging on some merchandise. It is possible many items had tags I could not see but I also know I was not observing any visible protective devices, wraps, boxes, Sensormatic Safers or the like. I had a large case of water in my shopping cart and as I was trying to figure out how I was going to scan it over the scan bed my wife pointed out that there was a hand held scanner available. I didn’t have to remove the water from the cart. It dawned on me, what kind of anti-shoplifting program allows a customer to hand scan an item and leave it in the shopping cart? I can only guess a program built on trust…hmmm, that is an odd system in my way of Loss Prevention Manager thinking. As busy as the cashiers were talking to each other I wonder how many other things I could have “forgotten” to scan and left in the buggy if I were a shoplifter.
     Someone reading this is thinking that the store has a door greeter who would have caught the items and asked for a receipt if the items were visible. It is even possible the Sensormatic security system or anti-theft system in place would alarm and prompt a receipt check. I will agree to an extent. This store was very busy. The greeter was busy straightening shopping carts as my wife and I approached and we were able to walk out with the water without being asked for a receipt. Add to this that not everything is protected with an anti-shoplifting device or tag. I am sure that softlines merchandise in this store does not have clothing security tags on them. That means there is a strong possibility no electronic article surveillance alarm would ever sound to prompt a receipt check by the greeter. 
     Putting on my Manager hat what I would like to see from stores that are going to more of these self-checkout stations is this; have no more than four self-checkout stations to one cashier. The cashier has to be able to react to errors at a register and monitor for theft and fraud concerns. More than four and it becomes very difficult for one person to manage. Operationally a store still saves on three cashiers not being needed. Have a greeter at the door focused on meeting customers, offering directions and being alert to exposed merchandise and ready to respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. Finally to have an effective anti-shoplifting strategy a store has to protect merchandise with electronic article surveillance towers and tags. My preferred system is by Sensormatic because of their reliability and diversity of products but ultimately protect your merchandise. Making changes to become more efficient is fine but don’t be complacent. Managers will always have to manage and people no matter how good a new process seems to be.
Get more information on a Sensormatic security system, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today.
 

I was in line at a big box retail store and was struck by several things that left me pondering their front end operation strategy and the anti-shoplifting program. This store has undergone a remodel of the front end replacing some of the cash registers with additional self-checkout counters. As my wife and I stood in line waiting to go through the self-checkout lanes I could not help but to be amused that I was standing in line in a system that was supposed to speed up the checkout process. Now, I get amused (and annoyed) relatively easily especially when I see how dumb something is. So I note while standing in this line that a lane becomes open. The cashier(s) who are supposed to be directing traffic are having a conversation. Please note that I said cashiers in the plural.  That’s right, this model of efficiency, had TWO cashiers working in the self-checkout line. These two were not paying attention to the customers, what they were doing or when they were finishing their transactions. What should have been a faster process was painfully slow. I turned to my wife and suggested how much faster it could have been had the second cashier been on a register checking out patrons rather than wagging the tongue. I think she shushed me at this point as my voice tends to carry especially when it is speaking sarcasms. I also saw some things that made me wonder about how the store’s merchandise protection.

I will tell you that I know this store has electronic article surveillance in use but I do not know if it is a Sensormatic security system or a competitor brand. Regardless I saw a lot of merchandise going through the self-check lanes and I was not seeing any security tags. Now I will acknowledge that this company is one that does use vendor source tagging on some merchandise. It is possible many items had tags I could not see but I also know I was not observing any visible protective devices, wraps, boxes, Sensormatic Safers or the like. I had a large case of water in my shopping cart and as I was trying to figure out how I was going to scan it over the scan bed my wife pointed out that there was a hand held scanner available. I didn’t have to remove the water from the cart. It dawned on me, what kind of anti-shoplifting program allows a customer to hand scan an item and leave it in the shopping cart? I can only guess a program built on trust…hmmm, that is an odd system in my way of Loss Prevention Manager thinking. As busy as the cashiers were talking to each other I wonder how many other things I could have “forgotten” to scan and left in the buggy if I were a shoplifter.

Someone reading this is thinking that the store has a door greeter who would have caught the items and asked for a receipt if the items were visible. It is even possible the Sensormatic security system or anti-theft system in place would alarm and prompt a receipt check. I will agree to an extent. This store was very busy. The greeter was busy straightening shopping carts as my wife and I approached and we were able to walk out with the water without being asked for a receipt. Add to this that not everything is protected with an anti-shoplifting device or tag. I am sure that softlines merchandise in this store does not have clothing security tags on them. That means there is a strong possibility no electronic article surveillance alarm would ever sound to prompt a receipt check by the greeter. 

 

Putting on my Manager hat what I would like to see from stores that are going to more of these self-checkout stations is this; have no more than four self-checkout stations to one cashier. The cashier has to be able to react to errors at a register and monitor for theft and fraud concerns. More than four and it becomes very difficult for one person to manage. Operationally a store still saves on three cashiers not being needed. Have a greeter at the door focused on meeting customers, offering directions and being alert to exposed merchandise and ready to respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. Finally to have an effective anti-shoplifting strategy a store has to protect merchandise with electronic article surveillance towers and tags. My preferred system is by Sensormatic because of their reliability and diversity of products but ultimately protect your merchandise. Making changes to become more efficient is fine but don’t be complacent.Managers will always have to manage and people no matter how good a new process seems to be.

 

Get more information on a Sensormatic security system, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 today. 

 

 

Solutions To Combat Shoplifting and Employee Theft

Shrinkage – Employee theft, shoplifting, clerical and vendor errors-is an issue that big and small retailers have in common. From Wal-mart to Target and whole-sellers like Costco, shoplifting is a common occurrence that cost the retail industry billions of dollars each year. 

Many small business owners in the retail industry choose to not prosecute the theft.  The reasons? The cost associated with prosecuting a shoplifter or employee theft is too costly for many of them and believe at the end of the ordeal it is in their best interest to take the theft as a business loss. 

For the big retail chains, theft is important and the measures they take to prevent, prosecute and avoid it are serious.  The profits are greatly diminished when shoplifting, employee theft, and vendor or clerical errors occur frequently in their business.

How can they be profitable if they do not combat a financially crippling problem?

 The retail industry’s shrinkage average nationwide is between 1%-2%, and for many retailers that is a big chunk of their profits that will disappear every year.  Big retailers like J.C. Penney and Costco have implemented shrink measures that have seen shrink reduction decrease tremendously.  Costco shrink’s rate is just 0.11% to 0.12% of sales and J. C. Penney has seen a decrease of 20% reduction in shrink dollars. 

The security measures they have been implemented in those stores are the big difference between out of control losses and security measures that are working out for them to prevent theft in their stores.

For many of these stores, implementing technology to combat theft is the first step they take in their quest to prevent it.  

Personnel training is another big change they take into consideration when dealing with theft.  Research has shown for many years now, that a happy employee is an employee that will, in the long run, be an asset to your business. Training employees, and providing them with a good salary are investments that many companies take seriously, and research has shown happy employees provide a better customer experience that results in less theft.

Shoplifting and employee theft are hard to combat and they can be hard to understand when looking at profits. There are solutions your store can implement to combat them and to give you peace of mind. Finding a solution is necessary and too important to ignore for too long.

Steps To Take When It Is Necessary To Stop Shoplifting By Friendly Customers

 

Sensormatic tags – 3                                                                                                                WC blog 780
Stop shoplifting – 3
Steps To Take When It Is Necessary To Stop Shoplifting By Friendly Customers
     One of the most difficult situations a store employee can face when trying to stop shoplifting is when the employee knows the person who is believed to be stealing. The thought came to me recently when my daughter told me about this kind of situation in the store where she works. A customer my daughter has known for several years at this location became so familiar to my daughter and other employees that they greet her by name. Once this customer even offered my daughter a job at a store she owned at the time. Recently my daughter has become suspicious of this woman and the other night suspected the woman had shoplifted. The customer’s large handbag had filled out and several anti-shoplifting hard tags were found in the area the woman had been “shopping” in. My daughter quizzed me on how this suspect could have removed the tags from merchandise. I reminded her that if the woman had owned a retail store at some point she may very well have had a device to remove Sensormatic tags or a tool for whichever electronic article surveillance system my daughter’s store employs.
     There are two sad facts contained in this little story. The first is shoplifters can be the people you might least expect them to be. They can come from any walk of life, and they can be the nicest people you could ever meet. They can be charming to such an extent they could charm the socks right off your feet and you would never know. The second is that there are thieves who have managed to get their hands on devices used to remove Sensormatic tags. Each of these can be the cause for major concern for a retailer. Before you become TOO concerned, know that there is a solution to both of these dilemmas and that is by offering superior customer service. 
     While there is no substitute for the protection and security of your merchandise that is provided with retail anti-theft devices the importance of customer service cannot be underestimated either. Maybe your merchandise protection strategy is to tag only certain high-theft items or SKU’s. That still leaves the other merchandise vulnerable to criminals. Customer service is the best way to stop shoplifting of these items. It also makes theft difficult for the thief who may be in possession of a removal device. Opportunity is a necessity for a shoplifter to conduct their “business” and customer service removes the opportunity from the equation. A thief can’t steal if someone is right there offering help or suggestions selling.
     The issue of WHO is shoplifting can be more difficult. As I said, it can be anyone from young to old. The only thing a store employee can do is to offer service to everyone. There are certain indicators of someone who may be intent on stealing but it is usually their actions or what they are wearing or carrying that will give them away. Only proper training from a reputable source experienced in the detection and apprehension of shoplifters can make a team successful at this. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has training available to help retailers stop shoplifting and the experience to back up their training.
     When someone is trying to steal and they have been able to make “acquaintances” in the store and build trust, it is terribly difficult to identify their dishonest activity. Why is that? Because of the rapport they have established. Even casual friendships have a certain level of trust that develops with them. That trust can blind sales associates and that is what these shoplifters count on. HOWEVER, when it is suspected that the “friendly” shopper is stealing and personnel start giving more focused customer service that “friendly” shopper can become very testy and even belligerent. That is what my daughter encountered as she started to give more assistance than usual to the suspected crook. The formerly friendly flatterer didn’t take kindly to the extra attention and her veneer vanished. She began quizzing my daughter about why she was hanging around her and asking if she (my daughter) had a problem. The suspect who normally made large purchases (and carried out a gorged purse) made a small purchase and left the store. No tags were found that time.
     Sensormatic tags should always be the first line of defense to prevent theft. They have to be complemented with customer service. Customer service can promote sales while simultaneously curbing crafty crooks. Just be aware that shoplifters who once were chatty Cathy’s may turn into Nasty Nancy’s if their underhandedness is uncovered. Get training that will prepare you and your team for these uncomfortable encounters.
For more information about Sensormatic Tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.    

One of the most difficult situations a store employee can face when trying to stop shoplifting is when the employee knows the person who is believed to be stealing. The thought came to me recently when my daughter told me about this kind of situation in the store where she works. A customer my daughter has known for several years at this location became so familiar to my daughter and other employees that they greet her by name. Once this customer even offered my daughter a job at a store she owned at the time. Recently my daughter has become suspicious of this woman and the other night suspected the woman had shoplifted. The customer’s large handbag had filled out and several anti-shoplifting hard tags were found in the area the woman had been “shopping” in. My daughter quizzed me on how this suspect could have removed the tags from merchandise. I reminded her that if the woman had owned a retail store at some point she may very well have had a device to remove Sensormatic tags or a tool for whichever electronic article surveillance system my daughter’s store employs.

There are two sad facts contained in this little story. The first is shoplifters can be the people you might least expect them to be. They can come from any walk of life, and they can be the nicest people you could ever meet. They can be charming to such an extent they could charm the socks right off your feet and you would never know. The second is that there are thieves who have managed to get their hands on devices used to remove Sensormatic tags. Each of these can be the cause for major concern for a retailer. Before you become TOO concerned, know that there is a solution to both of these dilemmas and that is by offering superior customer service. 

While there is no substitute for the protection and security of your merchandise that is provided with retail anti-theft devices the importance of customer service cannot be underestimated either. Maybe your merchandise protection strategy is to tag only certain high-theft items or SKU’s. That still leaves the other merchandise vulnerable to criminals. Customer service is the best way to stop shoplifting of these items. It also makes theft difficult for the thief who may be in possession of a removal device. Opportunity is a necessity for a shoplifter to conduct their “business” and customer service removes the opportunity from the equation. A thief can’t steal if someone is right there offering help or suggestions selling.

The issue of WHO is shoplifting can be more difficult. As I said, it can be anyone from young to old. The only thing a store employee can do is to offer service to everyone. There are certain indicators of someone who may be intent on stealing but it is usually their actions or what they are wearing or carrying that will give them away. Only proper training from a reputable source experienced in the detection and apprehension of shoplifters can make a team successful at this. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has training available to help retailers stop shoplifting and the experience to back up their training.

When someone is trying to steal and they have been able to make “acquaintances” in the store and build trust, it is terribly difficult to identify their dishonest activity. Why is that? Because of the rapport they have established. Even casual friendships have a certain level of trust that develops with them. That trust can blind sales associates and that is what these shoplifters count on. HOWEVER, when it is suspected that the “friendly” shopper is stealing and personnel start giving more focused customer service that “friendly” shopper can become very testy and even belligerent. That is what my daughter encountered as she started to give more assistance than usual to the suspected crook. The formerly friendly flatterer didn’t take kindly to the extra attention and her veneer vanished. She began quizzing my daughter about why she was hanging around her and asking if she (my daughter) had a problem. The suspect who normally made large purchases (and carried out a gorged purse) made a small purchase and left the store. No tags were found that time.

Sensormatic tags should always be the first line of defense to prevent theft. They have to be complemented with customer service. Customer service can promote sales while simultaneously curbing crafty crooks. Just be aware that shoplifters who once were chatty Cathy’s may turn into Nasty Nancy’s if their underhandedness is uncovered. Get training that will prepare you and your team for these uncomfortable encounters.

 

For more information about Sensormatic Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.    

 

 

Benefitting From A Sensormatic System Part 2


                                                                                                                                                WC Blog 791
Sensormatic systems – 4
Stop shoplifting – 3

Benefitting From A Sensormatic System Part 2

     If you read Part 1 you know that we are talking about the features and benefits of Sensormatic systems. If you didn’t have the opportunity to read Part 1 well what are you waiting for? Just kidding, you can read it later and I feel confident you will want to after you get finished with this article. The premise for the article was the result of a training session conducted at the store where I work. Yes, I paid attention to the training but it did make me think about how I could apply it to anti-theft systems and why Sensormatic is a superior choice over other electronic article surveillance manufacturers and distributors. The topic we are in the midst of is the difference between features and benefits of something and in this instance we are talking about Sensormatic technology. In Part 1 we looked at just a few of the features and benefits of Sensormatic equipment but there are so many I ran out of space for my article. I have several more points I really wanted to cover so that is what Part 2 is devoted to.

     Much of my Loss Prevention career had me using mostly radio frequency (RF) electronic article surveillance tags and labels. One feature that Sensormatic acousto-magnetic tags offer that RF devices do not is that they can be placed on merchandise that contains metals, liquids or merchandise placed in a metal shopping cart. If we are looking at the benefits of Sensormatic systems for a retailer we want to see how it improves something for that retailer. Well, if one of the reasons to invest in an anti-theft system is to stop shoplifting the benefit of using Sensormatic acousto-magnetic labels is that more merchandise can be protected than with RF tags. It also means a retailer does not have to start the costly changeover from metal shopping carts to plastic carts.

   Another benefit when using Sensormatic APXlabels is the time that is saved when merchandise is returned. When merchandise is returned in the original packaging and an acousto-magnetic label is attached it can be reactivated. There is no need to go through the process of retagging that item. With RF labels a store employee has to put a new tag on the goods that are returned (if they even think to do it which is less often than you might think). 

     Let’s talk a little about the features of the Sensormatic Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal. Who wants to buy an anti-theft system to stop shoplifting that has no ability to be upgraded? You want an improvement to a system you have to go out and purchase a whole new set of pedestals. The Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal, one of the many Sensormatic systems towers on the market can start you out with the very minimum requirements to prevent criminals from stealing and that is fine. What you learn later as you start seeing improvements of in-stocks and sales begin to increase a bit is that there is still theft taking place. The benefit of owning the Sensormatic Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal is that you can upgrade it with several features without having to spend more money on a whole new tower. You also don’t have to have your store torn up as old pedestals are removed and new ones are installed. Add-in the upgrades of a Synergy camera and people counting device and you truly increase your ability to positively improve sales. 

     And I am not done with the Sensormatic Synergy pedestals. Add the feature of metal foil detection and you have the ability to stop shoplifting by professional shoplifters. The benefits speak for themselves. Foil the would-be shoplifters attempting to bring in their foil lined bags and you save untold amounts of shortage. Discourage these guys from coming in and you also create a safer environment for your employees and customers. Professional shoplifters can be dangerous and pose risks to the safety of everyone around them.

     Sensormatic systems have been proven to be effective over the years. Many retailers rely on their tags and equipment to protect the merchandise they carry. They have seen how Sensormatic not only reduces theft but enhances sales in the process. The features offered with these systems allows easy upgrades and protection not offered by competitors. Do the math and find out how you can benefit from using Sensormatic products in your store.
Need information on Sensormatic systems? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.     

     

If you read Part 1 you know that we are talking about the features and benefits of Sensormatic systems. If you didn’t have the opportunity to read Part 1 well what are you waiting for? Just kidding, you can read it later and I feel confident you will want to after you get finished with this article. The premise for the article was the result of a training session conducted at the store where I work. Yes, I paid attention to the training but it did make me think about how I could apply it to anti-theft systems and why Sensormatic is a superior choice over other electronic article surveillance manufacturers and distributors. The topic we are in the midst of is the difference between features and benefits of something and in this instance we are talking about Sensormatic technology. In Part 1 we looked at just a few of the features and benefits of Sensormatic equipment but there are so many I ran out of space for my article. I have several more points I really wanted to cover so that is what Part 2 is devoted to.
     

Much of my Loss Prevention career had me using mostly radio frequency (RF) electronic article surveillance tags and labels. One feature that Sensormatic acousto-magnetic tags offer that RF devices do not is that they can be placed on merchandise that contains metals, liquids or merchandise placed in a metal shopping cart. If we are looking at the benefits of Sensormatic systems for a retailer we want to see how it improves something for that retailer. Well, if one of the reasons to invest in an anti-theft system is to stop shoplifting the benefit of using Sensormatic acousto-magnetic labels is that more merchandise can be protected than with RF tags. It also means a retailer does not have to start the costly changeover from metal shopping carts to plastic carts.
   

Another benefit when using Sensormatic APX labels is the time that is saved when merchandise is returned. When merchandise is returned in the original packaging and an acousto-magnetic label is attached it can be reactivated. There is no need to go through the process of retagging that item. With RF labels a store employee has to put a new tag on the goods that are returned (if they even think to do it which is less often than you might think). 
     

Let’s talk a little about the features of the Sensormatic Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal. Who wants to buy an anti-theft system to stop shoplifting that has no ability to be upgraded? You want an improvement to a system you have to go out and purchase a whole new set of pedestals. The Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal, one of the many Sensormatic systems towers on the market can start you out with the very minimum requirements to prevent criminals from stealing and that is fine. What you learn later as you start seeing improvements of in-stocks and sales begin to increase a bit is that there is still theft taking place. The benefit of owning the Sensormatic Synergy 2.0 ABS Pedestal is that you can upgrade it with several features without having to spend more money on a whole new tower. You also don’t have to have your store torn up as old pedestals are removed and new ones are installed. Add-in the upgrades of a Synergy camera and people counting device and you truly increase your ability to positively improve sales. 
     

And I am not done with the Sensormatic Synergy pedestals. Add the feature of metal foil detection and you have the ability to stop shoplifting by professional shoplifters. The benefits speak for themselves. Foil the would-be shoplifters attempting to bring in their foil lined bags and you save untold amounts of shortage. Discourage these guys from coming in and you also create a safer environment for your employees and customers. Professional shoplifters can be dangerous and pose risks to the safety of everyone around them.
     

Sensormatic systems have been proven to be effective over the years. Many retailers rely on their tags and equipment to protect the merchandise they carry. They have seen how Sensormatic not only reduces theft but enhances sales in the process. The features offered with these systems allows easy upgrades and protection not offered by competitors. Do the math and find out how you can benefit from using Sensormatic products in your store.

 

Need information on Sensormatic systemsGive us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.