Sensormatic Hard Tags Can Prevent Purse Pilferage and More

 

                                                                                                                             WC blog 835
Sensormatic Hard Tags – 3
Stop Shoplifting – 3
Sensormatic Hard Tags Can Prevent Purse Pilferage and More
     Shoplifting takes shape in the form of many different people and that can make it difficult to stop shoplifting. From the young child to the kindly grandmother and business owners must be on guard to protect against it.  Is that mother shopping in your store with her children slipping things into her purse while browsing your merchandise? Is that businessman in the suit and tie trustworthy because he appears to be a businessman?  Since there is no way to predict who is going to steal from your store the best decision you can make is to use Sensormatic hard tags to protect your merchandise.  Sesnormatic’s line of tags and labels offer stores the ability to deter theft no matter what the products are that you sell. 
     Thieves can come into your store and you never know who it may be, and sometimes it will surprise you.  A woman entered the store where I worked as a Loss Prevention Associate with her young daughter in tow. They entered the purse and handbag department, a high shortage area. Since it was a high theft department I began closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance. The mother began removing the paper that filled the purse and tugged off the price tags.  I expected the woman to put the purse on her shoulder and walk out of the store. I was shocked as the mother put the handbag on her daughter’s shoulder and started to exit. I stopped the mother and young girl and told the woman she had to return with me and when she asked why I told her because of what she had done with the merchandise. The mother chastised her daughter for trying to steal the purse! I did stop shoplifting of the merchandise but I could not help but feel for the daughter. I couldn’t stop the life she was probably going to grow up with if her mother didn’t change. The point of the story is you don’t know who is going to shoplift. It could be the mother and her child or it may be a drug addict or both. Looks can be deceiving. The second point is that had the purse been protected with a Sensormatic hard tag the theft attempt probably would not have happened in the first place.
     The versatility of Sensormatic devices allows retailers of any size to protect product lines.  Do you sell clothing, sporting goods or purses? There is a Sensormatic hard tag for you that can be used on multiple items. The Sensormatic AM Alarming 3-Tone Supertag would be a great solution. It can be pinned through any of these items and provide a triple layer of protection. The first is an alarm if the tag is tampered with. The next layer is that the tag will set off Sensormatic pedestals if tagged merchandise is carried into the detection field. Finally these devices have an internal alarm that will sound if the tag is carried past the towers and outside the store. You may be asking if it makes a difference if the tag alarm sounds if it is carried out of the store. I will tell you it does because it tells everyone outside the store that the suspect stole merchandise and crooks don’t want to be identified.
     If the 3-Tone Sensormatic hard tag had been used on our purses I am reasonably certain the suspect would not have bothered trying to walk out with the merchandise and would have saved her daughter from the experience. By removing the manufacturer’s label she showed she was trying to make the handbag look like it was a personal item. A Sensormatic tag would have been obvious to any observer it was not her (or her daughter’s) purse. That is the value of anti-theft products, to deter potential thieves from stealing.
     Sensormatic tags themselves won’t stop shoplifting but they are certain to make criminals think twice before committing a crime. Having a good customer service culture combined with anti-theft products will significantly reduce shoplifting and increase profits for your store and that is what you should be striving for. 
For more information about Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 
      
     

Shoplifting takes shape in the form of many different people and that can make it difficult to stop shoplifting. From the young child to the kindly grandmother and business owners must be on guard to protect against it.  Is that mother shopping in your store with her children slipping things into her purse while browsing your merchandise? Is that businessman in the suit and tie trustworthy because he appears to be a businessman?  Since there is no way to predict who is going to steal from your store the best decision you can make is to use Sensormatic hard tags to protect your merchandise.  Sesnormatic’s line of tags and labels offer stores the ability to deter theft no matter what the products are that you sell. 

Thieves can come into your store and you never know who it may be, and sometimes it will surprise you.  A woman entered the store where I worked as a Loss Prevention Associate with her young daughter in tow. They entered the purse and handbag department, a high shortage area. Since it was a high theft department I began closed circuit television (CCTV) surveillance. The mother began removing the paper that filled the purse and tugged off the price tags.  I expected the woman to put the purse on her shoulder and walk out of the store. I was shocked as the mother put the handbag on her daughter’s shoulder and started to exit. I stopped the mother and young girl and told the woman she had to return with me and when she asked why I told her because of what she had done with the merchandise. The mother chastised her daughter for trying to steal the purse! I did stop shoplifting of the merchandise but I could not help but feel for the daughter. I couldn’t stop the life she was probably going to grow up with if her mother didn’t change. The point of the story is you don’t know who is going to shoplift. It could be the mother and her child or it may be a drug addict or both. Looks can be deceiving. The second point is that had the purse been protected with a Sensormatic hard tag the theft attempt probably would not have happened in the first place.

The versatility of Sensormatic devices allows retailers of any size to protect product lines.  Do you sell clothing, sporting goods or purses? There is a Sensormatic hard tag for you that can be used on multiple items. The Sensormatic AM Alarming 3-Tone Supertag would be a great solution. It can be pinned through any of these items and provide a triple layer of protection. The first is an alarm if the tag is tampered with. The next layer is that the tag will set off Sensormatic pedestals if tagged merchandise is carried into the detection field. Finally these devices have an internal alarm that will sound if the tag is carried past the towers and outside the store. You may be asking if it makes a difference if the tag alarm sounds if it is carried out of the store. I will tell you it does because it tells everyone outside the store that the suspect stole merchandise and crooks don’t want to be identified.

If the 3-Tone Sensormatic hard tag had been used on our purses I am reasonably certain the suspect would not have bothered trying to walk out with the merchandise and would have saved her daughter from the experience. By removing the manufacturer’s label she showed she was trying to make the handbag look like it was a personal item. A Sensormatic tag would have been obvious to any observer it was not her (or her daughter’s) purse. That is the value of anti-theft products, to deter potential thieves from stealing.

Sensormatic tags themselves won’t stop shoplifting but they are certain to make criminals think twice before committing a crime. Having a good customer service culture combined with anti-theft products will significantly reduce shoplifting and increase profits for your store and that is what you should be striving for. 

 

For more information about Sensormatic hard tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

 

Overcoming Language Barriers In Retail From Customer Service To Sensormatic Labels

 

Sensormatic Labels – 3                                                                                                          WC Blog 822
Stop Shoplifting – 3
Overcoming Language Barriers In Retail From Customer Service To Sensormatic Labels
     When I write articles about Sensormatic labels or theft prevention I sometimes have to catch myself not using Loss Prevention terminology. The same can be true when I am asked to train a new employee. I will sometimes ask that person if they have retail experience so I have an idea how simplistic I have to be when instructing the employee. Language can be a barrier in many things even when we speak the same language. There are times in retail when we have to be able to interpret what a customer is saying to us. I have had someone looking around our store and seemed to be looking for something specific. I ask if I can assist and they say I don’t know what it’s called but I need such and such and they begin to try to describe it. The other day a customer tried to describe to me an attachment he wanted for his computer to hook it up to his router. It required me to really have to decipher what he was trying to tell me he wanted. Eventually I figured out he wanted a wireless adapter for his computer. It was a task but it was worth the time I spent because he did make the purchase. Had I not spent the time the patron would have left without making a purchase and the store would have lost the sale. Using terminology appropriate to an audience is an important aspect of retail and I would include Loss Prevention in that when discussing how to stop shoplifting.
     Think of some jargon you use when training a new employee in a store. Do you revert to acronyms and talk about a POS (point of sale) or do you talk about a UPC (universal price code)? Maybe you jump into training and talk about endcaps, wings, gondolas or zoning and forget to define what these are. Your new employee gives you that glazed look but you don’t pick up the unspoken signals they are giving that should tell you they are lost. Yes, even unspoken signals are a type of language all their own. Right or wrong you are expected to pick up on them. When I would speak to a new Loss Prevention Associate I had to explain the difference between anti-theft devices. Sensormatic labels are much different than Sensormatic hard tags. They provide different levels of security while both operate on an electronic article surveillance system. Which brings me to Loss Prevention acronyms. We use PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom cameras), perp (perpetrator), and some may use NPI (non-productive incident) for a bad stop. We sometimes forget that new people don’t know what we take for granted. We assume what they don’t know they will pick up on in due time. Shame on us. As managers and trainers we owe it to our new employees to speak in language they understand. If I expect to train managers in stores with no Loss Prevention department about how to stop shoplifting I have to clarify terms familiar to me. BOB (Bottom of Basket), LISA (Look InSide Always), PETER (Pass Everything Through Every Time) are acronyms I and many in big box retail know. But not every manager is going to know what they mean and they will start looking around for these people. If we are going to train new employees using acronyms or jargon, we have to define the meaning of the words so our employees/managers will be successful.
      If I want to train your managers on protecting merchandise against theft using electronic article surveillance I need to talk about how Sensormatic labels are applied to merchandise. I don’t want it slapped on to goods. I want branding to be right and I don’t want to cover warning labels or manufacturer labels if possible. I am going to demonstrate how to put a Sensormatic hard tag on and why it needs to be placed consistently. Put a clothing tag wherever you feel like placing one and cashiers are going to take longer to remove tags or a large number of false alarms are going to occur. I will demonstrate how to test a Sensormatic system, troubleshoot minor problems and how remote monitoring can often prevent the need for service calls. Finally, if I am training your managers I am going to teach them how a proper response to a Sensormatic alarm can improve the chance of recovering unpaid merchandise and stop shoplifting. 
     Knowing how to speak the language of an audience can be helpful in much of what we do in retail. From customer service to training to loss prevention the right words and ability to read body language can influence how well the store performs. Build stronger teams and client relations through better communication.
 Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

When I write articles about Sensormatic labels or theft prevention I sometimes have to catch myself not using Loss Prevention terminology. The same can be true when I am asked to train a new employee. I will sometimes ask that person if they have retail experience so I have an idea how simplistic I have to be when instructing the employee. Language can be a barrier in many things even when we speak the same language. There are times in retail when we have to be able to interpret what a customer is saying to us. I have had someone looking around our store and seemed to be looking for something specific. I ask if I can assist and they say I don’t know what it’s called but I need such and such and they begin to try to describe it. The other day a customer tried to describe to me an attachment he wanted for his computer to hook it up to his router. It required me to really have to decipher what he was trying to tell me he wanted. Eventually I figured out he wanted a wireless adapter for his computer. It was a task but it was worth the time I spent because he did make the purchase. Had I not spent the time the patron would have left without making a purchase and the store would have lost the sale. Using terminology appropriate to an audience is an important aspect of retail and I would include Loss Prevention in that when discussing how to stop shoplifting.

Think of some jargon you use when training a new employee in a store. Do you revert to acronyms and talk about a POS (point of sale) or do you talk about a UPC (universal price code)? Maybe you jump into training and talk about endcaps, wings, gondolas or zoning and forget to define what these are. Your new employee gives you that glazed look but you don’t pick up the unspoken signals they are giving that should tell you they are lost. Yes, even unspoken signals are a type of language all their own. Right or wrong you are expected to pick up on them. When I would speak to a new Loss Prevention Associate I had to explain the difference between anti-theft devices. Sensormatic labels are much different than Sensormatic hard tags. They provide different levels of security while both operate on an electronic article surveillance system. Which brings me to Loss Prevention acronyms. We use PTZ (pan-tilt-zoom cameras), perp (perpetrator), and some may use NPI (non-productive incident) for a bad stop. We sometimes forget that new people don’t know what we take for granted. We assume what they don’t know they will pick up on in due time. Shame on us. As managers and trainers we owe it to our new employees to speak in language they understand. If I expect to train managers in stores with no Loss Prevention department about how to stop shoplifting I have to clarify terms familiar to me. BOB (Bottom of Basket), LISA (Look InSide Always), PETER (Pass Everything Through Every Time) are acronyms I and many in big box retail know. But not every manager is going to know what they mean and they will start looking around for these people. If we are going to train new employees using acronyms or jargon, we have to define the meaning of the words so our employees/managers will be successful.

If I want to train your managers on protecting merchandise against theft using electronic article surveillance I need to talk about how Sensormatic labels are applied to merchandise. I don’t want it slapped on to goods. I want branding to be right and I don’t want to cover warning labels or manufacturer labels if possible. I am going to demonstrate how to put a Sensormatic hard tag on and why it needs to be placed consistently. Put a clothing tag wherever you feel like placing one and cashiers are going to take longer to remove tags or a large number of false alarms are going to occur. I will demonstrate how to test a Sensormatic system, troubleshoot minor problems and how remote monitoring can often prevent the need for service calls. Finally, if I am training your managers I am going to teach them how a proper response to a Sensormatic alarm can improve the chance of recovering unpaid merchandise and stop shoplifting. 

Knowing how to speak the language of an audience can be helpful in much of what we do in retail. From customer service to training to loss prevention the right words and ability to read body language can influence how well the store performs. Build stronger teams and client relations through better communication. 

 

Need information on Sensormatic labels? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

From Clothing Security To Human Resources Consistency Is Important

 

Sensormatic Tags –3                                                                                                           WC Blog 832
Clothing security -3
From Clothing Security To Human Resources Consistency Is Important
     From the use of Sensormatic tags to prevent theft to how you enforce policies in your store, consistency is an important factor in how successful or unsuccessful your business will be. I thought about consistency as I attended a college baseball game not long ago. The team had started off the season strong and was ranked as high as 11 in one of the NCAA baseball polls early on. Then for some unexplained reason the team just fell into a slump. Pitching became inconsistent, batting was hit or miss (pun intended) and watching the team in their dugout the energy was gone. The night before I attended my game our team had run roughshod over their opponent. The night I attended the tables turned 180 degrees and we got our clock cleaned. You can’t have this kind of on again – off again performance and expect to make a run for the National Baseball Championship. In retail consistency also matters and that can be in how you manage clothing security and tag clothing or how you handle attendance issues with your team members.
     On more than one occasion I have been shopping in a retail store and I have looked at the way merchandise is protected. I may see one television with a wrap on it and another that is left with no anti-theft device right next to it. I have observed purses with different styles of security devices placed in different locations. For the cashiers this is a terrible way to tag products. They spend time trying to search and ensure there are no tags “hidden” somewhere that might set off the alarm and embarrass the customer. It can lead to a waste of productivity at the checkout counter. On the other hand I have shopped in the clothing store where my daughter works and I have been very impressed with the consistency of how they employ Sensormatic tags. All of the dresses were tagged at the collar and ALL of the shoes were tagged the same way based on the style of the shoe. The only thing I did not care for was the use of different brands of tags. I would have preferred to see a consistent use of only Sensormatic products. I know how effective they are in clothing security and theft prevention all around because I have used them in my Loss Prevention career.
         Consistency is also important when it comes to personnel matters. Let’s say you have an employee who is a great worker but they consistently show up late to work sometimes it is only 5 minutes and other times it may be 15 or 20 minutes. Because they are a good worker you may verbally remind them they have to be to work on time but you don’t want to lose them so you give them some leeway. Then you have other employees who you do enforce a tardiness policy on. Those people get a verbal warning, a written warning and then a final warning. If you are enforcing the policy on them but not on your superstar you are creating an unfair workplace and you are fostering resentment within your team. Consistent application of policies is just as critical to a productive workplace as the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing. Stores invest a lot of time protecting merchandise that same level of energy or more should be placed on team development and morale.
     Consistency in following a return policy is another operational issue that can be disruptive and hurt a store. I understand that managers will from time to time have to use sound judgement and make exceptions in the arena of customer service. However exceptions should be that exceptions and not the rule. If your employees feel that they have followed store procedures and a manager is called to address a customer complaint about a return policy. The first thing that manager must do is listen to the associate then the customer and make it clear that the employee was following proper procedure. If the manager chooses to make an exception he/she must say that this is an exception and will not be done again. It builds the credibility of the employee and shows that management supports them. If a manager is regularly making exceptions to policies that is another problem and the store manager should be addressing that issue. 
     From clothing security to personnel matters consistency in how tasks are accomplished and people are treated absolutely make an impact in how successful a store will be. Just like a baseball team there will be losses from time to time but the best teams perform consistently day after day. Make daily routines and consistent expectations a part of your business and see your business grow.
Sensormatic tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

From the use of Sensormatic tags to prevent theft to how you enforce policies in your store, consistency is an important factor in how successful or unsuccessful your business will be. I thought about consistency as I attended a college baseball game not long ago. The team had started off the season strong and was ranked as high as 11 in one of the NCAA baseball polls early on. Then for some unexplained reason the team just fell into a slump. Pitching became inconsistent, batting was hit or miss (pun intended) and watching the team in their dugout the energy was gone. The night before I attended my game our team had run roughshod over their opponent. The night I attended the tables turned 180 degrees and we got our clock cleaned. You can’t have this kind of on again – off again performance and expect to make a run for the National Baseball Championship. In retail consistency also matters and that can be in how you manage clothing security and tag clothing or how you handle attendance issues with your team members.

On more than one occasion I have been shopping in a retail store and I have looked at the way merchandise is protected. I may see one television with a wrap on it and another that is left with no anti-theft device right next to it. I have observed purses with different styles of security devices placed in different locations. For the cashiers this is a terrible way to tag products. They spend time trying to search and ensure there are no tags “hidden” somewhere that might set off the alarm and embarrass the customer. It can lead to a waste of productivity at the checkout counter. On the other hand I have shopped in the clothing store where my daughter works and I have been very impressed with the consistency of how they employ Sensormatic tags. All of the dresses were tagged at the collar and ALL of the shoes were tagged the same way based on the style of the shoe. The only thing I did not care for was the use of different brands of tags. I would have preferred to see a consistent use of only Sensormatic products. I know how effective they are in clothing security and theft prevention all around because I have used them in my Loss Prevention career.

Consistency is also important when it comes to personnel matters. Let’s say you have an employee who is a great worker but they consistently show up late to work sometimes it is only 5 minutes and other times it may be 15 or 20 minutes. Because they are a good worker you may verbally remind them they have to be to work on time but you don’t want to lose them so you give them some leeway. Then you have other employees who you do enforce a tardiness policy on. Those people get a verbal warning, a written warning and then a final warning. If you are enforcing the policy on them but not on your superstar you are creating an unfair workplace and you are fostering resentment within your team. Consistent application of policies is just as critical to a productive workplace as the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing. Stores invest a lot of time protecting merchandise that same level of energy or more should be placed on team development and morale.

Consistency in following a return policy is another operational issue that can be disruptive and hurt a store. I understand that managers will from time to time have to use sound judgement and make exceptions in the arena of customer service. However exceptions should be that exceptions and not the rule. If your employees feel that they have followed store procedures and a manager is called to address a customer complaint about a return policy. The first thing that manager must do is listen to the associate then the customer and make it clear that the employee was following proper procedure. If the manager chooses to make an exception he/she must say that this is an exception and will not be done again. It builds the credibility of the employee and shows that management supports them. If a manager is regularly making exceptions to policies that is another problem and the store manager should be addressing that issue. 

From clothing security to personnel matters consistency in how tasks are accomplished and people are treated absolutely make an impact in how successful a store will be. Just like a baseball team there will be losses from time to time but the best teams perform consistently day after day. Make daily routines and consistent expectations a part of your business and see your business grow.

 

Sensormatic tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

 

 

Your Way Overdue If You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags To Protect Baby Clothes






Clothing Security Tags – 4                                                                                                           WC Blog 823
Sensormatic Tags – 3

Your Way Overdue If You Don’t Use Sensormatic Tags To Protect Baby Clothes 

     When discussing the use of clothing security tags to stop theft what comes to mind first, swim suits, dresses, slacks or dress shirts? Maybe you would say baseball hats, ties and maybe even accessories including purses and wallets. You wouldn’t be wrong but I would like to suggest that you could be missing out on an entire line of products that can be expensive in their own right. Infant clothes can be just as vulnerable to theft as grown-up attire and in some instances they can be an easier target for those looking for the five-finger discount. I have had mothers I caught loading up infant diaper bags while shopping with their toddlers. I once had an entire family pushing a baby stroller and a couple of the group would conceal merchandise under the blankets inside the stroller. Oh don’t worry the baby was fine, the dad was carrying the infant so she wouldn’t be disturbed. One thing I learned over the seventeen or so years I spent in Loss Prevention was that if it isn’t tied down or protected with Sensormatic tags someone will probably try to steal it.

     The theft of baby and toddler clothing can happen more often than you might think and it can cost retailers a lot of money. For example, according to live5news.com, April 26, 2019, in a story, “Cops: Wanted couple had toddler with them during shoplifting at baby clothing shop”, a couple shoplifted “approximately $132.97” in merchandise. Items believed stolen included “…boy’s pajamas and boys swim trunks”. Now that may not sound like a huge haul but for a small boutique that can have quite an impact. Were clothing security tags in use? I cannot say for certain. After a bit of searching on the internet and I believe I found the store’s website and pictures and I did not see any evidence. There were no visible Sensormatic towers at the doors and I did not see any Sensormatic tags hanging from the clothing.
     Do you need more evidence that baby apparel and care products are a hot commodity? The Napa Valley Register report on November 16, 2018 displayed the headline, “Woman arrested for stealing more than $1,200 of baby items and other merchandise, police say”. The report said that, “A woman was arrested for stealing diapers, baby blankets, baby clothes (emphasis mine), Pediasure, orange juice, batteries and more in American Canyon…” Again, we have another instance where infant clothes were stolen and the store the suspect was stealing from does not use clothing security tags on any of the clothing merchandise they carry. The business where the theft took place is a huge entity and I dare say can afford the losses that take place in their locations. However, should these thefts take place in the small retail establishment such hits are not sustainable. 

     The solution is simple to prevent such losses but there are retailers who decide not to take the steps that would solve the issue. Installing a Sensormatic security system is the first recommendation I give to businesses. No, don’t go trying to buy a used system or a second-rate electronic article surveillance brand. Purchase a new Sensormatic system and you know you are getting a quality product. Better yet, purchase that system from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and you will also receive free training on how to stop shoplifting from people who worked in Retail Loss Prevention. You won’t get that offer from another company. After installing the security system you will want to protect merchandise with Sensormatic tags. Again, if you purchase your system through Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. they can provide you with best practices for tagging and make suggestions on what you should be tagging in your store.

     Shoplifting is a problem and it affects all clothing retail stores from fine apparel to infant clothes. Criminals are only concerned with how much they can steal without being caught and how much they can get for the merchandise. Don’t be a childish and throw a tantrum when they steal from you. Be proactive and get clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system now.
Need information on clothing security tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.      

When discussing the use of clothing security tags to stop theft what comes to mind first, swim suits, dresses, slacks or dress shirts? Maybe you would say baseball hats, ties and maybe even accessories including purses and wallets. You wouldn’t be wrong but I would like to suggest that you could be missing out on an entire line of products that can be expensive in their own right. Infant clothes can be just as vulnerable to theft as grown-up attire and in some instances they can be an easier target for those looking for the five-finger discount. I have had mothers I caught loading up infant diaper bags while shopping with their toddlers. I once had an entire family pushing a baby stroller and a couple of the group would conceal merchandise under the blankets inside the stroller. Oh don’t worry the baby was fine, the dad was carrying the infant so she wouldn’t be disturbed. One thing I learned over the seventeen or so years I spent in Loss Prevention was that if it isn’t tied down or protected with Sensormatic tags someone will probably try to steal it.
     

The theft of baby and toddler clothing can happen more often than you might think and it can cost retailers a lot of money. For example, according to live5news.com, April 26, 2019, in a story, “Cops: Wanted couple had toddler with them during shoplifting at baby clothing shop”, a couple shoplifted “approximately $132.97” in merchandise. Items believed stolen included “…boy’s pajamas and boys swim trunks”. Now that may not sound like a huge haul but for a small boutique that can have quite an impact. Were clothing security tags in use? I cannot say for certain. After a bit of searching on the internet and I believe I found the store’s website and pictures and I did not see any evidence. There were no visible Sensormatic towers at the doors and I did not see any Sensormatic tags hanging from the clothing.     

 

 Do you need more evidence that baby apparel and care products are a hot commodity? The Napa Valley Register report on November 16, 2018 displayed the headline, “Woman arrested for stealing more than $1,200 of baby items and other merchandise, police say”. The report said that, “A woman was arrested for stealing diapers, baby blankets, baby clothes (emphasis mine), Pediasure, orange juice, batteries and more in American Canyon…” Again, we have another instance where infant clothes were stolen and the store the suspect was stealing from does not use clothing security tags on any of the clothing merchandise they carry. The business where the theft took place is a huge entity and I dare say can afford the losses that take place in their locations. However, should these thefts take place in the small retail establishment such hits are not sustainable. 

     

The solution is simple to prevent such losses but there are retailers who decide not to take the steps that would solve the issue. Installing a Sensormatic security system is the first recommendation I give to businesses. No, don’t go trying to buy a used system or a second-rate electronic article surveillance brand. Purchase a new Sensormatic system and you know you are getting a quality product. Better yet, purchase that system from Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. and you will also receive free training on how to stop shoplifting from people who worked in Retail Loss Prevention. You won’t get that offer from another company. After installing the security system you will want to protect merchandise with Sensormatic tags. Again, if you purchase your system through Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. they can provide you with best practices for tagging and make suggestions on what you should be tagging in your store.
     

Shoplifting is a problem and it affects all clothing retail stores from fine apparel to infant clothes. Criminals are only concerned with how much they can steal without being caught and how much they can get for the merchandise. Don’t be a childish and throw a tantrum when they steal from you. Be proactive and get clothing security tags and a Sensormatic system now.

 

Need information on clothing security tags? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.      

 

A Conversation About Clothing Security

 

Clothing Security –3                                                                                                                     WC Blog 818
Sensormatic tags -3
A Conversation About Clothing Security
     I am sitting here in the college library where I work and I am hearing a conversation behind me about clothing security. The speaker is loud and I cannot help but overhear the discussion, though trust me I would rather not hear most of it. I did hear him talk about working in a fitting room at the store where he is employed and finding that someone had stolen merchandise. I could not catch all of what he was saying but somehow he or the people in the store knew that the same person had been in the store twice stealing. That got me to thinking, how did you know that the same person was in the store twice in one day stealing? Did someone review video and see this? I also want to know how someone was able to steal if the fitting is attended by an associate? I could not hear particulars and just as quickly as it started the conversation switched to another topic and was just as annoying but now I was on to writing my article. This conversation provided the perfect lead in. Just how do you prevent clothing theft and should you be concerned with everything or just certain items?
     Since the yappy student behind me started the whole thing let’s begin with the way to prevent shoplifting. Your first instinct may be to say that using Sensormatic tags and security system is going to be my first recommendation. Your first instinct is going to be wrong. What I am going to tell you is that the first thing you need to do to reduce clothing theft is to get Manager training on how to stop shoplifting and also employee theft. That’s right, shoplifters aren’t the only people carting off clothing. Merchandise theft is an internal problem as much as an external one and in some cases it involves both. Owners and store managers have to know how to identify the signals and indicators that gives thieves away. That can only be possible when someone has undergone proper training. Once that is done you can begin training employees on how to help stop the shortage too. 
     Now you just know that the next step is going to involve placing Sensormatic tags and installing a security system. Again, you are wrong. You want to reduce theft? Start using pre-employment background screening and drug testing. No, you aren’t testing your customers. You test the people you are thinking about hiring. You eliminate the riff-raff and improve the chances that your staff is filled with honest personnel who do not pose security concerns for your business.
     You know what’s coming now don’t you, yup now is when you install that Sensormatic system and begin using clothing security tags on merchandise. You don’t necessarily have to tag everything to begin seeing results. Tag merchandise your inventory results point to as high theft departments and begin to prevent shoplifting there. If your store sells shoes place tags on the most popular brands. I would not encourage you to tag flip flops or low-end designs. Tag what shoplifters are stealing. Fashion accessories such as purses, wallets, scarves and neckties can also be high theft items in the clothing world. Purses are highly vulnerable since they can be tossed over a shoulder and look like it belongs to the carrier. The same holds true for hats, you put it on your head and walk out of the store. Unless employees are paying attention hats are easy to steal. 
     This brings us full circle to where that annoying conversation comes in to play. Attention is a requirement for employees to help prevent shoplifting. If they are not paying attention to what is taking place around them the shoplifters are going to go unnoticed and commit their crimes. You can use clothing security tags on merchandise but if your workers are inattentive or apathetic they are not going to be effective in responding to electronic article surveillance alarms at the doors. They will also be careless in inspecting what people are taking in and out of the fitting rooms.  The same thief will be able to enter the store numerous times during a day and no one will notice. 
     Install a Sensormatic system and use Sensormatic tags on the clothes that are being stolen. Train your managers on how to stop theft. Use pre-employment screening to reduce the chance for theft in your store and finally make sure employees are actively engaging customers. You do this and the conversation I heard in the library will be a non-issue for you. 
For more information on about clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 

I am sitting here in the college library where I work and I am hearing a conversation behind me about clothing security. The speaker is loud and I cannot help but overhear the discussion, though trust me I would rather not hear most of it. I did hear him talk about working in a fitting room at the store where he is employed and finding that someone had stolen merchandise. I could not catch all of what he was saying but somehow he or the people in the store knew that the same person had been in the store twice stealing. That got me to thinking, how did you know that the same person was in the store twice in one day stealing? Did someone review video and see this? I also want to know how someone was able to steal if the fitting is attended by an associate? I could not hear particulars and just as quickly as it started the conversation switched to another topic and was just as annoying but now I was on to writing my article. This conversation provided the perfect lead in. Just how do you prevent clothing theft and should you be concerned with everything or just certain items?

Since the yappy student behind me started the whole thing let’s begin with the way to prevent shoplifting. Your first instinct may be to say that using Sensormatic tags and security system is going to be my first recommendation. Your first instinct is going to be wrong. What I am going to tell you is that the first thing you need to do to reduce clothing theft is to get Manager training on how to stop shoplifting and also employee theft. That’s right, shoplifters aren’t the only people carting off clothing. Merchandise theft is an internal problem as much as an external one and in some cases it involves both. Owners and store managers have to know how to identify the signals and indicators that gives thieves away. That can only be possible when someone has undergone proper training. Once that is done you can begin training employees on how to help stop the shortage too. 

Now you just know that the next step is going to involve placing Sensormatic tags and installing a security system. Again, you are wrong. You want to reduce theft? Start using pre-employment background screening and drug testing. No, you aren’t testing your customers. You test the people you are thinking about hiring. You eliminate the riff-raff and improve the chances that your staff is filled with honest personnel who do not pose security concerns for your business.

You know what’s coming now don’t you, yup now is when you install that Sensormatic system and begin using clothing security tags on merchandise. You don’t necessarily have to tag everything to begin seeing results. Tag merchandise your inventory results point to as high theft departments and begin to prevent shoplifting there. If your store sells shoes place tags on the most popular brands. I would not encourage you to tag flip flops or low-end designs. Tag what shoplifters are stealing. Fashion accessories such as purses, wallets, scarves and neckties can also be high theft items in the clothing world. Purses are highly vulnerable since they can be tossed over a shoulder and look like it belongs to the carrier. The same holds true for hats, you put it on your head and walk out of the store. Unless employees are paying attention hats are easy to steal. 

This brings us full circle to where that annoying conversation comes in to play. Attention is a requirement for employees to help prevent shoplifting. If they are not paying attention to what is taking place around them the shoplifters are going to go unnoticed and commit their crimes. You can use clothing security tags on merchandise but if your workers are inattentive or apathetic they are not going to be effective in responding to electronic article surveillance alarms at the doors. They will also be careless in inspecting what people are taking in and out of the fitting rooms.  The same thief will be able to enter the store numerous times during a day and no one will notice. 

Install a Sensormatic system and use Sensormatic tags on the clothes that are being stolen. Train your managers on how to stop theft. Use pre-employment screening to reduce the chance for theft in your store and finally make sure employees are actively engaging customers. You do this and the conversation I heard in the library will be a non-issue for you. 

 

For more information on about clothing security, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567 

 

 

Steps To Take When It Is Necessary To Stop Shoplifting By Friendly Customers

 

Sensormatic tags – 3                                                                                                                WC blog 780
Stop shoplifting – 3
Steps To Take When It Is Necessary To Stop Shoplifting By Friendly Customers
     One of the most difficult situations a store employee can face when trying to stop shoplifting is when the employee knows the person who is believed to be stealing. The thought came to me recently when my daughter told me about this kind of situation in the store where she works. A customer my daughter has known for several years at this location became so familiar to my daughter and other employees that they greet her by name. Once this customer even offered my daughter a job at a store she owned at the time. Recently my daughter has become suspicious of this woman and the other night suspected the woman had shoplifted. The customer’s large handbag had filled out and several anti-shoplifting hard tags were found in the area the woman had been “shopping” in. My daughter quizzed me on how this suspect could have removed the tags from merchandise. I reminded her that if the woman had owned a retail store at some point she may very well have had a device to remove Sensormatic tags or a tool for whichever electronic article surveillance system my daughter’s store employs.
     There are two sad facts contained in this little story. The first is shoplifters can be the people you might least expect them to be. They can come from any walk of life, and they can be the nicest people you could ever meet. They can be charming to such an extent they could charm the socks right off your feet and you would never know. The second is that there are thieves who have managed to get their hands on devices used to remove Sensormatic tags. Each of these can be the cause for major concern for a retailer. Before you become TOO concerned, know that there is a solution to both of these dilemmas and that is by offering superior customer service. 
     While there is no substitute for the protection and security of your merchandise that is provided with retail anti-theft devices the importance of customer service cannot be underestimated either. Maybe your merchandise protection strategy is to tag only certain high-theft items or SKU’s. That still leaves the other merchandise vulnerable to criminals. Customer service is the best way to stop shoplifting of these items. It also makes theft difficult for the thief who may be in possession of a removal device. Opportunity is a necessity for a shoplifter to conduct their “business” and customer service removes the opportunity from the equation. A thief can’t steal if someone is right there offering help or suggestions selling.
     The issue of WHO is shoplifting can be more difficult. As I said, it can be anyone from young to old. The only thing a store employee can do is to offer service to everyone. There are certain indicators of someone who may be intent on stealing but it is usually their actions or what they are wearing or carrying that will give them away. Only proper training from a reputable source experienced in the detection and apprehension of shoplifters can make a team successful at this. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has training available to help retailers stop shoplifting and the experience to back up their training.
     When someone is trying to steal and they have been able to make “acquaintances” in the store and build trust, it is terribly difficult to identify their dishonest activity. Why is that? Because of the rapport they have established. Even casual friendships have a certain level of trust that develops with them. That trust can blind sales associates and that is what these shoplifters count on. HOWEVER, when it is suspected that the “friendly” shopper is stealing and personnel start giving more focused customer service that “friendly” shopper can become very testy and even belligerent. That is what my daughter encountered as she started to give more assistance than usual to the suspected crook. The formerly friendly flatterer didn’t take kindly to the extra attention and her veneer vanished. She began quizzing my daughter about why she was hanging around her and asking if she (my daughter) had a problem. The suspect who normally made large purchases (and carried out a gorged purse) made a small purchase and left the store. No tags were found that time.
     Sensormatic tags should always be the first line of defense to prevent theft. They have to be complemented with customer service. Customer service can promote sales while simultaneously curbing crafty crooks. Just be aware that shoplifters who once were chatty Cathy’s may turn into Nasty Nancy’s if their underhandedness is uncovered. Get training that will prepare you and your team for these uncomfortable encounters.
For more information about Sensormatic Tags contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.    

One of the most difficult situations a store employee can face when trying to stop shoplifting is when the employee knows the person who is believed to be stealing. The thought came to me recently when my daughter told me about this kind of situation in the store where she works. A customer my daughter has known for several years at this location became so familiar to my daughter and other employees that they greet her by name. Once this customer even offered my daughter a job at a store she owned at the time. Recently my daughter has become suspicious of this woman and the other night suspected the woman had shoplifted. The customer’s large handbag had filled out and several anti-shoplifting hard tags were found in the area the woman had been “shopping” in. My daughter quizzed me on how this suspect could have removed the tags from merchandise. I reminded her that if the woman had owned a retail store at some point she may very well have had a device to remove Sensormatic tags or a tool for whichever electronic article surveillance system my daughter’s store employs.

There are two sad facts contained in this little story. The first is shoplifters can be the people you might least expect them to be. They can come from any walk of life, and they can be the nicest people you could ever meet. They can be charming to such an extent they could charm the socks right off your feet and you would never know. The second is that there are thieves who have managed to get their hands on devices used to remove Sensormatic tags. Each of these can be the cause for major concern for a retailer. Before you become TOO concerned, know that there is a solution to both of these dilemmas and that is by offering superior customer service. 

While there is no substitute for the protection and security of your merchandise that is provided with retail anti-theft devices the importance of customer service cannot be underestimated either. Maybe your merchandise protection strategy is to tag only certain high-theft items or SKU’s. That still leaves the other merchandise vulnerable to criminals. Customer service is the best way to stop shoplifting of these items. It also makes theft difficult for the thief who may be in possession of a removal device. Opportunity is a necessity for a shoplifter to conduct their “business” and customer service removes the opportunity from the equation. A thief can’t steal if someone is right there offering help or suggestions selling.

The issue of WHO is shoplifting can be more difficult. As I said, it can be anyone from young to old. The only thing a store employee can do is to offer service to everyone. There are certain indicators of someone who may be intent on stealing but it is usually their actions or what they are wearing or carrying that will give them away. Only proper training from a reputable source experienced in the detection and apprehension of shoplifters can make a team successful at this. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has training available to help retailers stop shoplifting and the experience to back up their training.

When someone is trying to steal and they have been able to make “acquaintances” in the store and build trust, it is terribly difficult to identify their dishonest activity. Why is that? Because of the rapport they have established. Even casual friendships have a certain level of trust that develops with them. That trust can blind sales associates and that is what these shoplifters count on. HOWEVER, when it is suspected that the “friendly” shopper is stealing and personnel start giving more focused customer service that “friendly” shopper can become very testy and even belligerent. That is what my daughter encountered as she started to give more assistance than usual to the suspected crook. The formerly friendly flatterer didn’t take kindly to the extra attention and her veneer vanished. She began quizzing my daughter about why she was hanging around her and asking if she (my daughter) had a problem. The suspect who normally made large purchases (and carried out a gorged purse) made a small purchase and left the store. No tags were found that time.

Sensormatic tags should always be the first line of defense to prevent theft. They have to be complemented with customer service. Customer service can promote sales while simultaneously curbing crafty crooks. Just be aware that shoplifters who once were chatty Cathy’s may turn into Nasty Nancy’s if their underhandedness is uncovered. Get training that will prepare you and your team for these uncomfortable encounters.

 

For more information about Sensormatic Tags, contact us or call 1.866.914.2567.    

 

 

Clothing Security – A Local Problem Or Something Bigger? Part 3


Sensormatic tags -3                                                                                                                    WC Blog 763
clothing security – 5

Clothing Security – A Local Problem Or Something Bigger? Part 3

     In Parts 1 and 2 I discussed the problem clothing security when merchants have to combat opportunistic shoplifters and Organized Retail Crime rings. We discussed the international reach some of these groups can have in their theft activity. We also looked at the difficulty retailers can have in distinguishing between opportunists and professional shoplifters. Does it make a difference to identify one versus the other? In our examples of Organized crime we saw the impact on one national chain and how they are getting hit for thousands of dollars in theft on multiple incidents and in different parts of the nation. I pointed out that the anti-theft tactics of retail stores has to be multi-layered. It starts with the cultivation of a strong customer service focus. Employees must actively seek out and interact with shoppers. With a very few rare exceptions thieves do not want to be seen or assisted. Anonymity gives them the cover they need to steal.

     The use of electronic article surveillance and Sensormatic tags is the next layer of protection. Shoplifters would prefer to steal clothing that has no security device on it. Anti-theft tags pose the risk of alarm activations and they require some means of removal if the clothes they are on are lifted successfully from a store. I did mention in the earlier articles that professional theft rings may use booster bags that are intended to defeat electronic article surveillance devices but Sensormatic tags provide the ultimate protection since they are not affected by these theft tools.

     The next layer of anti-theft protection a store can incorporate is training to prevent shoplifting. You can use clothing security tags to prevent theft but if your store management team and employees have not received training to stop shoplifting then you are not doing all you can to put a stop to crime. You may think you are training your managers to ensure all customers are receiving customer service but I am here to tell you that is not enough. To truly take steps to address shoplifting a store owner has to have a team trained in all aspects of theft prevention. If you can do that you will deter the casual crook and the professional pilferer.  The in-depth training I am alluding to does not come from the novice but a business built around helping retailers improve shortage results and increase profits. 

     Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) specializes in retail theft prevention offering everything from clothing security options to store risk assessments and a wide range of training options. With LPSI’s services, a retail owner can schedule live, in-person training seminars, live webinar training, emailed Loss Prevention tips and online monthly newsletters with articles from experienced Loss Prevention Professionals. Did you know there are proper ways to respond to electronic article surveillance alarm activations? Are you aware that an anti-theft system that is not functioning properly can become a liability to your customer service efforts and they can also impact the effectiveness of a system? There are best practices for the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing; do you know what those best practices are? Do you and your team know how to identify common characteristics of shoplifters? Do you know the differences between Organized Retail Crime organizations and opportunistic shoplifters? Do you and your team know how to deter each and when it is appropriate to contact police about suspicious activity? LPSI can train your staff on all of these issues and how they can stay safe in the process. 

     Since this series on clothing security has been about Organized Retail Crime and training I want to give a word of caution to store managers and owners. Shoplifting is not a “victimless crime” and in cases involving organized theft rings it can be dangerous. Some of the people involved can be extremely aggressive. If you take the steps I have outlined in these articles you will enhance clothing security (and the security of other merchandise) while keeping your employees safe. Above all else, THAT should be your number one priority.
For more information on clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

In Parts 1 and 2 I discussed the problem clothing security when merchants have to combat opportunistic shoplifters and Organized Retail Crime rings. We discussed the international reach some of these groups can have in their theft activity. We also looked at the difficulty retailers can have in distinguishing between opportunists and professional shoplifters. Does it make a difference to identify one versus the other? In our examples of Organized crime we saw the impact on one national chain and how they are getting hit for thousands of dollars in theft on multiple incidents and in different parts of the nation. I pointed out that the anti-theft tactics of retail stores has to be multi-layered. It starts with the cultivation of a strong customer service focus. Employees must actively seek out and interact with shoppers. With a very few rare exceptions thieves do not want to be seen or assisted. Anonymity gives them the cover they need to steal.
     

The use of electronic article surveillance and Sensormatic tags is the next layer of protection. Shoplifters would prefer to steal clothing that has no security device on it. Anti-theft tags pose the risk of alarm activations and they require some means of removal if the clothes they are on are lifted successfully from a store. I did mention in the earlier articles that professional theft rings may use booster bags that are intended to defeat electronic article surveillance devices but Sensormatic tags provide the ultimate protection since they are not affected by these theft tools.
     

The next layer of anti-theft protection a store can incorporate is training to prevent shoplifting. You can use clothing security tags to prevent theft but if your store management team and employees have not received training to stop shoplifting then you are not doing all you can to put a stop to crime. You may think you are training your managers to ensure all customers are receiving customer service but I am here to tell you that is not enough. To truly take steps to address shoplifting a store owner has to have a team trained in all aspects of theft prevention. If you can do that you will deter the casual crook and the professional pilferer.  The in-depth training I am alluding to does not come from the novice but a business built around helping retailers improve shortage results and increase profits. 
     

Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) specializes in retail theft prevention offering everything from clothing security options to store risk assessments and a wide range of training options. With LPSI’s services, a retail owner can schedule live, in-person training seminars, live webinar training, emailed Loss Prevention tips and online monthly newsletters with articles from experienced Loss Prevention Professionals. Did you know there are proper ways to respond to electronic article surveillance alarm activations? Are you aware that an anti-theft system that is not functioning properly can become a liability to your customer service efforts and they can also impact the effectiveness of a system? There are best practices for the placement of Sensormatic tags on clothing; do you know what those best practices are? Do you and your team know how to identify common characteristics of shoplifters? Do you know the differences between Organized Retail Crime organizations and opportunistic shoplifters? Do you and your team know how to deter each and when it is appropriate to contact police about suspicious activity? LPSI can train your staff on all of these issues and how they can stay safe in the process. 
     

Since this series on clothing security has been about Organized Retail Crime and training I want to give a word of caution to store managers and owners. Shoplifting is not a “victimless crime” and in cases involving organized theft rings it can be dangerous. Some of the people involved can be extremely aggressive. If you take the steps I have outlined in these articles you will enhance clothing security (and the security of other merchandise) while keeping your employees safe. Above all else, THAT should be your number one priority.

 

For more information on clothing security contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 2


          Sensormatic Hard Tags – 3                                                                              WC blog 747
          Stop Shoplifting – 4

What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 2

     I began this series relating a discussion I had with my son about what his role should be in order to stop shoplifting at his new job since he is only a sales associate. It came about I had asked him if he had any encounters with potential thieves as he works in the shoe department of this clothing chain. After telling me about a suspicious incident in which a customer may have stolen an expensive pair of shoes I told him what he can do in the future to help prevent a similar occurrence. I continued the article mentioning that in my former role as a Loss Prevention Manager for over 11 years I trained employees on how to place electronic article surveillance tags like the Sensormatic hard tags. I also trained employee on how to respond properly to electronic article surveillance alarms. My duties also included investigating employee theft cases and apprehending shoplifters. My general tip to my son and other retail employees is they should not be expected to be experts in identifying a shoplifter. They should however have a sense of when someone is suspicious and indicators to look for that would suggest it would be a good idea to notify a manager or Loss Prevention. They should also be ensuring that if the store uses electronic article surveillance devices they have an obligation to ensure merchandise is properly protected.

     Identifying suspicious people is not always easy to do. Sometimes there are behaviors that are suspicious and other times it may be the attire someone is wearing that may be suspicious. What is never acceptable and I warned my Loss Prevention Associates about NOT doing this is to base a suspicion on physical characteristics such as age or race. In my training I would use the following as tips for employees to determine if a shopper might be suspicious and help stop shoplifting:
Unseasonable clothing. If a person is wearing a heavy coat and the temperature outside does not warrant it that person should be given extra customer service.
Carrying a Large tote or handbag into the store that appears to be empty. Give that shopper a bit of extra attention and if the bag starts to appear fuller as they shop, become even more helpful.
When a person enters the store with a ball cap pulled down low and especially if wearing sunglasses into the store and not removing them, give extra attention to that person. They are probably trying to conceal their face from cameras.
This one is going to seem contrary to what a shoplifter would do but it was part of my talk with my son. If a customer seems TOO chatty and not about the products you are showing them, be suspicious. Sometimes it is a method used by thieves to try to gain the trust of an employee and I have even had a Loss Prevention officer of mine fooled by this tactic.
There is also the shopper who is quick to avoid ANY interaction with an associate. They don’t want any help, they stand in corners and out of the main traffic areas and they look around more than they look at the merchandise. They might be trying to find a way to remove Sensormatic hard tags or other anti-theft devices.
These are just a few tips from my experiences and training I received and provided. I would like to point out that at no time do I tell you that you or your staff should accuse or even suggest someone is trying to steal. Every customer should be greeted in a warm and welcoming manner and offered assistance, it is the right thing to do and it will improve sales. If any of the situations above take place then EXTRA customer service should be offered to stop shoplifting. Spend more time around the customer, engage them in conversation and give them little opportunity to conceal anything. Always be pleasant. The shoplifters tend to get vocal and start to make accusations of harassment but you can always fall back to the fact that you were strictly providing customer service. 

     These are a few suggestions to get you started but this is not all encompassing. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has more information on Sensormatic hard tags and security systems and how they can improve sales and profit. They also have training opportunities on how to prevent shoplifting and even employee theft. There are blogs, newsletters and videos filled with informative tips and tricks to help you improve and grow your business. You and your employees can stop shoplifting without ever placing anyone in a position of having to accuse a person of trying to steal and that keeps everyone safe.
For more information about how to stop shoplifting contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

I began this series relating a discussion I had with my son about what his role should be in order to stop shoplifting at his new job since he is only a sales associate. It came about I had asked him if he had any encounters with potential thieves as he works in the shoe department of this clothing chain. After telling me about a suspicious incident in which a customer may have stolen an expensive pair of shoes I told him what he can do in the future to help prevent a similar occurrence. I continued the article mentioning that in my former role as a Loss Prevention Manager for over 11 years I trained employees on how to place electronic article surveillance tags like the Sensormatic hard tags. I also trained employee on how to respond properly to electronic article surveillance alarms. My duties also included investigating employee theft cases and apprehending shoplifters. My general tip to my son and other retail employees is they should not be expected to be experts in identifying a shoplifter. They should however have a sense of when someone is suspicious and indicators to look for that would suggest it would be a good idea to notify a manager or Loss Prevention. They should also be ensuring that if the store uses electronic article surveillance devices they have an obligation to ensure merchandise is properly protected.
     

Identifying suspicious people is not always easy to do. Sometimes there are behaviors that are suspicious and other times it may be the attire someone is wearing that may be suspicious. What is never acceptable and I warned my Loss Prevention Associates about NOT doing this is to base a suspicion on physical characteristics such as age or race. In my training I would use the following as tips for employees to determine if a shopper might be suspicious and help stop shoplifting:

Unseasonable clothing. If a person is wearing a heavy coat and the temperature outside does not warrant it that person should be given extra customer service.

Carrying a Large tote or handbag into the store that appears to be empty. Give that shopper a bit of extra attention and if the bag starts to appear fuller as they shop, become even more helpful.

When a person enters the store with a ball cap pulled down low and especially if wearing sunglasses into the store and not removing them, give extra attention to that person. They are probably trying to conceal their face from cameras.

This one is going to seem contrary to what a shoplifter would do but it was part of my talk with my son. If a customer seems TOO chatty and not about the products you are showing them, be suspicious. Sometimes it is a method used by thieves to try to gain the trust of an employee and I have even had a Loss Prevention officer of mine fooled by this tactic.

There is also the shopper who is quick to avoid ANY interaction with an associate. They don’t want any help, they stand in corners and out of the main traffic areas and they look around more than they look at the merchandise. They might be trying to find a way to remove Sensormatic hard tags or other anti-theft devices.

These are just a few tips from my experiences and training I received and provided. I would like to point out that at no time do I tell you that you or your staff should accuse or even suggest someone is trying to steal. Every customer should be greeted in a warm and welcoming manner and offered assistance, it is the right thing to do and it will improve sales. If any of the situations above take place then EXTRA customer service should be offered to stop shoplifting. Spend more time around the customer, engage them in conversation and give them little opportunity to conceal anything. Always be pleasant. The shoplifters tend to get vocal and start to make accusations of harassment but you can always fall back to the fact that you were strictly providing customer service. 
     

These are a few suggestions to get you started but this is not all encompassing. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. has more information on Sensormatic hard tags and security systems and how they can improve sales and profit. They also have training opportunities on how to prevent shoplifting and even employee theft. There are blogs, newsletters and videos filled with informative tips and tricks to help you improve and grow your business. You and your employees can stop shoplifting without ever placing anyone in a position of having to accuse a person of trying to steal and that keeps everyone safe.

 

For more information about how to stop shoplifting contact us or call 1.866.914.2567

 

Clothing Security – A Local Problem Or Something Bigger? Part 2

 

                                                                                                                                                       WC Blog 762
Sensormatic Tags – 4
Clothing Security-4
Clothing Security – A Local Problem Or Something Bigger? Part 2
      In Part 1 of this series on clothing security I challenged retailers to begin looking at the problem of shoplifting as more than a local issue. I referenced an article I found on an international Organized Retail Crime (ORC) group that was caught in Australia. The international flavor to the story was that this group was based out of Chile and one member had been caught in a police raid on a hotel room in the Los Angeles, California area in 2018. One store that was specifically mentioned in the article that had been targeted by these people was Victoria’s Secret. I have more to say on that in a bit. What I am concerned about is whether or not retailers are looking at their merchandise shortage and assuming that they are just being targeted by opportunists? Are retailers using Sensormatic tags and systems to protect clothes from theft? Are all possible steps being taken to stop this activity?
     National chain store Loss Prevention Departments already know about Organized Retail Theft gangs and how they get away with their activity. Smaller, independent store owners may not be familiar with these gangs. Managers may not recognize that missing merchandise can be more than just shoplifting by people looking for kicks it may be something more ominous. Now I can’t be of much assistance to the national chain stores as they have their Loss Prevention Departments and most have decided on what their model of theft prevention is going to be. I CAN help those of you who own your own stores. I will tell you that if you don’t use Sensormatic tags and electronic article surveillance pedestals you are being hurt by shoplifters. They are emptying your shelves and keeping real patrons from being able to purchase those items. I can also tell you as I mentioned in Part 1 that there are layers to a strong anti-theft culture. It starts with customer service from the time a customer enters the store until the time they leave. I am not talking about haranguing someone but just greeting people, offering assistance being observant and being available. 
     The next layer to an anti-theft culture is the use of clothing security tags on merchandise. The security devices used in your store should be Sensormatic tags. Professional shoplifters, as mentioned in the news article in Part 1, use “booster bags”. These are bags lined with tin foil with the purpose of interfering with electronic article surveillance systems. Acousto-magnetic Sensormatic tags are immune to these bags so theft attempts are thwarted at the towers as a shoplifter approaches. Other brands of security tags will set off pedestals but a booster bag will prevent them from working correctly. I will also say that other brands are not as reliable as those manufactured by Sensormatic, especially if they are made by an unknown manufacturer.
     I pointed out that Victoria’s Secret was specifically mentioned as a victim by this international criminal theft ring. It would appear from the research I was able to do on this retailer that this chain uses for clothing security. If that is true then there is something going on that is not working properly in their protection strategy.  I do know that in searching articles on shoplifting this store pops up a lot. Many of those news items indicated the theft incidents were in the thousands of dollars. After finding out about a national organized retail crime organization stealing from there, I wondered how many similar theft activities might also be international in scope. Here are some examples of what I mean:
Gwinnet Daily Post, Jan 2, 2019 by Isabel Hughes – “Shoplifters steal over $300,000 from Gwinnett Victoria’s Secret stores”
Myrtlebeachonline.com, Dec 5, 2018 by Hannah Strong – “’Professional Shoplifters?’ Thieves stuff clothes in bags at Victoria’s Secret, cops say”. The story reports three people stole around $3,800 in clothes.
Greenvilleonline.com, Oct 9, 2018 by Teddy Kumala – “Men in bonnets shoplift thousands from Spartanburg Victoria’s Secret store”
Abc7chicago.com, March 13, 2018, “Women arrested for trying to steal 11Kworth of Victoria’s Secret bras”
I want to say that I am not being critical of Victoria’s Secret as they are the victim of these criminals. I am saying there is something that is going on that is creating these kinds of headlines. It is also making them a target of extremely significant shoplifting activity.
    The final layer in a strong anti-theft culture involves the training of store managers and personnel. In Part 3 of this series I will discuss the importance of manager training to prevent shoplifting and employee theft and how it relates to clothing security. 
Need information on clothing security? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

In Part 1 of this series on clothing security I challenged retailers to begin looking at the problem of shoplifting as more than a local issue. I referenced an article I found on an international Organized Retail Crime (ORC) group that was caught in Australia. The international flavor to the story was that this group was based out of Chile and one member had been caught in a police raid on a hotel room in the Los Angeles, California area in 2018. One store that was specifically mentioned in the article that had been targeted by these people was Victoria’s Secret. I have more to say on that in a bit. What I am concerned about is whether or not retailers are looking at their merchandise shortage and assuming that they are just being targeted by opportunists? Are retailers using Sensormatic tags and systems to protect clothes from theft? Are all possible steps being taken to stop this activity?

National chain store Loss Prevention Departments already know about Organized Retail Theft gangs and how they get away with their activity. Smaller, independent store owners may not be familiar with these gangs. Managers may not recognize that missing merchandise can be more than just shoplifting by people looking for kicks it may be something more ominous. Now I can’t be of much assistance to the national chain stores as they have their Loss Prevention Departments and most have decided on what their model of theft prevention is going to be. I CAN help those of you who own your own stores. I will tell you that if you don’t use Sensormatic tags and electronic article surveillance pedestals you are being hurt by shoplifters. They are emptying your shelves and keeping real patrons from being able to purchase those items. I can also tell you as I mentioned in Part 1 that there are layers to a strong anti-theft culture. It starts with customer service from the time a customer enters the store until the time they leave. I am not talking about haranguing someone but just greeting people, offering assistance being observant and being available. 

The next layer to an anti-theft culture is the use of clothing security tags on merchandise. The security devices used in your store should be Sensormatic tags. Professional shoplifters, as mentioned in the news article in Part 1, use “booster bags”. These are bags lined with tin foil with the purpose of interfering with electronic article surveillance systems. Acousto-magnetic Sensormatic tags are immune to these bags so theft attempts are thwarted at the towers as a shoplifter approaches. Other brands of security tags will set off pedestals but a booster bag will prevent them from working correctly. I will also say that other brands are not as reliable as those manufactured by Sensormatic, especially if they are made by an unknown manufacturer.

I pointed out that Victoria’s Secret was specifically mentioned as a victim by this international criminal theft ring. It would appear from the research I was able to do on this retailer that this chain uses for clothing security. If that is true then there is something going on that is not working properly in their protection strategy.  I do know that in searching articles on shoplifting this store pops up a lot. Many of those news items indicated the theft incidents were in the thousands of dollars. After finding out about a national organized retail crime organization stealing from there, I wondered how many similar theft activities might also be international in scope. Here are some examples of what I mean:

Gwinnet Daily Post, Jan 2, 2019 by Isabel Hughes – “Shoplifters steal over $300,000 from Gwinnett Victoria’s Secret stores”

Myrtlebeachonline.com, Dec 5, 2018 by Hannah Strong – “’Professional Shoplifters?’ Thieves stuff clothes in bags at Victoria’s Secret, cops say”. The story reports three people stole around $3,800 in clothes.

Greenvilleonline.com, Oct 9, 2018 by Teddy Kumala – “Men in bonnets shoplift thousands from Spartanburg Victoria’s Secret store”

Abc7chicago.com, March 13, 2018, “Women arrested for trying to steal 11Kworth of Victoria’s Secret bras”

I want to say that I am not being critical of Victoria’s Secret as they are the victim of these criminals. I am saying there is something that is going on that is creating these kinds of headlines. It is also making them a target of extremely significant shoplifting activity.

The final layer in a strong anti-theft culture involves the training of store managers and personnel. In Part 3 of this series I will discuss the importance of manager training to prevent shoplifting and employee theft and how it relates to clothing security. 

 

Need information on clothing security? Give us a call at 1.866.914.2567 now.

 

 

What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 1

 

Stop Shoplifting -5                                                                                                                      WC Blog 746
Sensormatic Hard Tags -3
What Should Retail Workers Be Expected To Do To Stop Shoplifting? Part 1
     Is everyone in your store prepared to stop shoplifting? Do they know what signs to look for that may tip them off that someone may try to steal? I was talking with my son who recently started working for a nationally known clothing retailer. He has been working in food retail for about 6 years but wanted to get try other areas and picked up this second job. He is assigned to the shoe department and so I was talking with him about whether he has encountered any theft incidents. He said he did have one occasion where he believes a theft took place and he didn’t realize it. He said he was busy straightening up his department and a man asked him about an expensive pair of shoes. My son said he noticed the customer was already wearing a pair like the ones he was inquiring about. My son went to the back wall and retrieved the size the customer was asking for and the customer “seemed friendly” and they talked for a few minutes and the patron left. A little later the department supervisor asked my son if he knew where the man had gone to, Loss Prevention suspected he had stolen the shoes. My son had no idea where the customer had gone and told them so. As we talked he said he must not be very good at identifying potential shoplifters. I asked if their store uses Sensormatic hard tags or other electronic article surveillance tags on the shoes to stop shoplifting and he said they do. I told him that the tags should set off the alarm system if the suspect hasn’t gotten hold of a detachment device that will work with their tags.
     This took me back to my days as a Loss Prevention Manager and I recalled the training I did with store employees. I spent time at orientations meeting with new staff members and teaching them some of the characteristics that help to identify crooks. I also reminded them they are not Loss Prevention and are not expected to nor did we want them to accuse anyone of trying to steal. I always stressed the importance of customer service and keeping Loss Prevention or management aware of suspicious persons. I also made sure my training for cashiers and front end supervisors included how to properly respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. If done properly a response to an alarm would result in recovered merchandise and a safe interaction. An improper response was another issue. The take away is that no one was expected to be a Loss Prevention professional. That was the job for my team and me. 
     I reminded my son that his job was to ensure that shoes were properly tagged with Sensormatic hard tags or whatever devices that store uses before a customer could get access to them. The other expectations were to offer great service and if he was suspicious of someone to contact Loss Prevention. I did give him some hints about what to look for that would make it easier for him to know when to contact his Loss Prevention Department.
     But how about you and your team? You probably do not have a Loss Prevention Department. Who trains you and your employees on how to stop shoplifting? Do you have a Sensormatic security system in your store? If you don’t are you aware of how much you could save in shortage reduction with the installation of a system? Would you know what may indicate someone is a shoplifter versus a shopper? We haven’t even touched on the problem of identifying dishonest employees and their impact on your store shortage. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is your go-to source for information on everything from Sensormatic hard tags and electronic article surveillance towers to training to stop shoplifting and employee theft. This is a company that has been in business since 1983 specializing in theft prevention and shortage reduction. Having conducted many Loss Prevention training sessions and worked in the field using retail anti-theft tools I have familiarized myself with LPSI’s offerings. I strongly urge retailers to consult with this company. They have all the resources usually available only to major retail chains (and more so in many cases).
     In Part 2 I will impart some of the advice I gave my son and training tips I used as a Loss Prevention Manager to instruct our store employees. What I can’t do is offer all of the resources to you that I have seen offered by LPSI. Read, Part 2, use it to help improve your efforts to stop shoplifting but also visit LPSI’s website. They can give so much more than I can in an article or two.
Sensormatic hard tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.

Is everyone in your store prepared to stop shoplifting? Do they know what signs to look for that may tip them off that someone may try to steal? I was talking with my son who recently started working for a nationally known clothing retailer. He has been working in food retail for about 6 years but wanted to get try other areas and picked up this second job. He is assigned to the shoe department and so I was talking with him about whether he has encountered any theft incidents. He said he did have one occasion where he believes a theft took place and he didn’t realize it. He said he was busy straightening up his department and a man asked him about an expensive pair of shoes. My son said he noticed the customer was already wearing a pair like the ones he was inquiring about. My son went to the back wall and retrieved the size the customer was asking for and the customer “seemed friendly” and they talked for a few minutes and the patron left. A little later the department supervisor asked my son if he knew where the man had gone to, Loss Prevention suspected he had stolen the shoes. My son had no idea where the customer had gone and told them so. As we talked he said he must not be very good at identifying potential shoplifters. I asked if their store uses Sensormatic hard tags or other electronic article surveillance tags on the shoes to stop shoplifting and he said they do. I told him that the tags should set off the alarm system if the suspect hasn’t gotten hold of a detachment device that will work with their tags.

This took me back to my days as a Loss Prevention Manager and I recalled the training I did with store employees. I spent time at orientations meeting with new staff members and teaching them some of the characteristics that help to identify crooks. I also reminded them they are not Loss Prevention and are not expected to nor did we want them to accuse anyone of trying to steal. I always stressed the importance of customer service and keeping Loss Prevention or management aware of suspicious persons. I also made sure my training for cashiers and front end supervisors included how to properly respond to electronic article surveillance alarms. If done properly a response to an alarm would result in recovered merchandise and a safe interaction. An improper response was another issue. The take away is that no one was expected to be a Loss Prevention professional. That was the job for my team and me. 

I reminded my son that his job was to ensure that shoes were properly tagged with Sensormatic hard tags or whatever devices that store uses before a customer could get access to them. The other expectations were to offer great service and if he was suspicious of someone to contact Loss Prevention. I did give him some hints about what to look for that would make it easier for him to know when to contact his Loss Prevention Department.

But how about you and your team? You probably do not have a Loss Prevention Department. Who trains you and your employees on how to stop shoplifting? Do you have a Sensormatic security system in your store? If you don’t are you aware of how much you could save in shortage reduction with the installation of a system? Would you know what may indicate someone is a shoplifter versus a shopper? We haven’t even touched on the problem of identifying dishonest employees and their impact on your store shortage. Loss Prevention Systems, Inc. (LPSI) is your go-to source for information on everything from Sensormatic hard tags and electronic article surveillance towers to training to stop shoplifting and employee theft. This is a company that has been in business since 1983 specializing in theft prevention and shortage reduction. Having conducted many Loss Prevention training sessions and worked in the field using retail anti-theft tools I have familiarized myself with LPSI’s offerings. I strongly urge retailers to consult with this company. They have all the resources usually available only to major retail chains (and more so in many cases).

In Part 2 I will impart some of the advice I gave my son and training tips I used as a Loss Prevention Manager to instruct our store employees. What I can’t do is offer all of the resources to you that I have seen offered by LPSI. Read, Part 2, use it to help improve your efforts to stop shoplifting but also visit LPSI’s website. They can give so much more than I can in an article or two.

 

Sensormatic hard tags are important and we can help you with them. Call 1.866.914.2567 and let’s talk.